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The study reveals what can be done by drinking your DNA




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While we really do not need more reasons to believe that drinking is unhealthy, new study offers a reason that covers most others. Short-term insecurity aside, it's possible drinking drunk, also changes us to the basic level of our being-in our DNA. This long-lasting genetic change can, however, result in stronger alcoholic desire, locking us in a cycle that ruins health from within.

National Institute for the Abuse of Alcohol and Alcoholism defines drinking as drinking as a "drinking model that leads to a concentration of alcohol in the blood of a person up to 0.08 grams per cent (0.08 grams per 100 ml of blood) or above," which usually happens "when men consume five or more drinks or women consume four or more drinks in about an hour. "

When viewed in that light, it is clear that more people are drunk than we think. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says one in six adults drink about four times a month and consumes about seven drinks in half. It's "17 billion total drinks that consume adults annually."

In a recent study, the researchers focused on two genes believed to be involved in the control of drinking behavior: PER2, which affects the body's biological clock, and POMC, which regulates our stress response system.

The researchers followed the changes in these genes into groups of moderate, overweight and severe alcoholics and realized that both genes were altered to excessive and heavy alcoholics through a process known as methylation. The hardest drinkers have also shown a reduction in the rate at which genes generate new proteins, known as gene expression. In fact, excessive drinking disables both genes.

The study also included an experiment designed to monitor the motivation of the participants to drink after being exposed to alcohol images and beer tasting tests. & Nbsp; The researchers found that changes in the genes arranged with a greater desire to drink alcohol between colds and heavy drinkers.

If this research is true, one way to see this is that over-drinking has a way to deactivate the genetic security system that normally regulates how much we drink. Once this happens, the internal desire monitor will be tamed, and the desire for the work itself that changes our mind will increase.

"We found that people who drink a lot can change DNA in a way that makes them even more eager alcohol," says Professor Deepak K. Sarkar, senior author of the study and director of the Endocrine Program at the Department of Life Sciences at Rutgers-New Brunswick University. "This can help explain why alcoholism is so strongly dependent and one day it can contribute to new ways to treat alcoholism or help prevent people from being addicted to risk."

The record of all this is easy to see, although – in the light of the vast number of people who depend on drinking every week of the year – hard to practice. Drinking with the drink is not only dangerous in the short term, but it can also change at the most basic level, causing a self-sustaining model that is not missing.

The study was published in the journal & nbsp;Alcoholism: Clinical & nbsp; & amp; Experimental research.

You can find David DiSally on & nbsp;Twitter,& nbsp;Facebook, & nbsp;Google Plus, and on his website,& nbsp;daviddisalvo.org.

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While we really do not need more reasons to believe that drinking is unhealthy, the new study offers a reason for most others. Aside from short-term insecurity, it may be possible to drink also changes us to the basic level of our being-in our DNA. This long-lasting genetic change can, however, result in stronger alcoholic desire, locking us in a cycle that ruins health from within.

The National Institute for the Abuse of Alcohol and Alcoholism defines drunkenness as a "drinking model that leads to a concentration of alcohol in the blood of a person of 0.08 grams per cent (0.08 grams per 100 ml of blood) or above", which usually happens " when men consume five or more drinks or women consume four or more drinks in about an hour. "

When viewed in that light, it is clear that more people are drunk than we think. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say one in six adults drink about four times a month and consumes about seven drinks after a delay. It's "17 billion total drinks that consume adults annually."

In a recent study, the researchers focused on two genes that are thought to be involved in drinking behavior control: PER2, which affects the body's biological clock, and POMC, which regulates our stress response system.

The researchers followed the changes in these genes into groups of moderate, overweight and severe alcoholics, and found that both genes were altered to overweight and severe alcoholics through a process known as methylation. The hardest drinkers have also shown a reduction in the rate at which genes generate new proteins, known as gene expression. In fact, excessive drinking disables both genes.

The study also included an experiment designed to follow the motivation of the participants to drink after being exposed to alcohol images and a taste test for beer. The researchers found that changes in the genes arranged with a greater desire to drink alcohol between colds and heavy drinkers.

If this research is true, one way to see this is that over-drinking has a way to deactivate the genetic security system that normally regulates how much we drink. Once this happens, the internal monitor of desire will be adjusted, and the desire for the very work that changes our mind will increase.

"We found that people who drink a lot can change DNA in a way that makes them even more eager alcohol," says Professor Deepak K. Sarkar, senior author of the study and director of the Endocrine Program at the Department of Life Sciences at Rutgers-New Brunswick University. "This can help explain why alcoholism is so strongly dependent and one day it can contribute to new ways to treat alcoholism or help prevent people from being addicted to risk."

The record of all this is easy to see, although – in the light of the vast number of people who depend on drinking every week of the year – hard to practice. Drinking is not only dangerous in the short term, but it can also change at the most basic level, causing a self-sustaining model that does not miss out.

The study was published in the journal Alcoholism: clinical and experimental research.

You can find David DiSally Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus, and on his website, daviddisalvo.org.


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