Tuesday , January 19 2021

Astronomers confirm the THIRD planet in the Kepler-47 binary star system



The Kepler mission has recorded thousands of exoplanets since 2014, with 30 planets smaller than twice as large as the Earth now known to orbit in zones that live in their zones.

Launched by Cape Canaveral on March 7th, 2009, Kepler's telescope helped in the search for planets outside the solar system.

He won his final photo on September 25, 2018 and ran out of fuel five days later.

When it was launched, it weighs 2,320 kg (1,052 kg) and is 15.4 meters long with a width of 8.9 meters (4.7 m × 2.7 m).

The satellite often requires Earth-like planets, which means they are rocky and orbiting within that orbit in a zone that is suitable for living or golden stars.

Altogether, Kepler found about 5,000 unconfirmed exoplanets "candidates" with an additional 2,500 "confirmed" exoplanets that scientists have since proved to be realistic.

Kepler is currently in the "K2" mission to discover more exoplanets.

K2 is the second mission for the spacecraft and was carried out as a necessity over desire, as two jet spacecraft failed.

These wheels control the direction and altitude of the spacecraft and help in the same direction.

The modified mission addresses the exoplanets around stars with tinted red dwarfs.

While the planet has found thousands of exoplanets during its eight-year mission, five are particularly stuck.

Kepler-452b, called

Kepler-452b, called the "Earth 2.0," has many features with our planet in addition to the 1.400-year-old headquarters. He found the Kepler telescope from Nasa in 2014

1) "Earth 2.0"

In 2014, the telescope made one of the biggest discoveries when it spotted a Kepler-452b explosive, dubbed "Earth 2.0".

The object shares many features with our planet in spite of the 1,400 light-years seats.

It has an orbit of similar size on the Earth, receives approximately the same amount of sunlight and has the same length of the year.

Experts are still not sure whether the planet is a host of life, but say that if plants are transferred there, they will likely survive.

2) The first planet found an orbit two stars

Kepler found a planet that orbits about two stars, known as a binary star system, in 2011.

The system, known as Kepler-16b, is about 200 light-years from Earth.

Experts compared the system to the famous "double sunset" written on the domestic planet Tatoin by Luke Skywalker in "Star Wars: A New Hope".

3) Finding the first inhabited planet outside the solar system

Scientists have discovered Kepler-22b in 2011, the first planet suitable for the life of astronomers outside the Solar System.

A sunny country that is suitable for living seems to be a large, rocky planet with a surface temperature of about 72 ° F (22 ° C), similar to the spring day on Earth.

4) Discovering the "super-Earth"

The telescope found its first "super-earth" in April 2017, a huge planet called LHS 1140b.

Orbits about 40 million light-years from the red dwarf star, and scientists consider it has the vast oceans of the magma.

5) Finding the star system "Trapist-1"

The Trapist-1 star system, which hosts a record seven planets similar to the Earth, was one of the biggest discoveries in 2017.

Each of the planets, orbiting a dwarf star with only 39 million light years, probably has water on its surface.

Three of the planets have such good conditions that scientists say life may have already evolved on them.

Kepler noticed the system in 2016, but scientists have discovered the discovery in a series of papers published in February this year.

Kepler is a telescope with an incredibly sensitive instrument known as a photometer that detects the smallest changes in light emitted by stars

Kepler is a telescope with an incredibly sensitive instrument known as a photometer that detects the smallest changes in light emitted by stars

How does Kepler discover the planets?

The telescope has an incredibly sensitive instrument known as a photometer that detects the smallest changes in light emitted by the stars.

At the same time, it monitors 100,000 stars, searching for drops of light intensity pointing to a planet that passes through the orbit between the satellite and its distant goal.

When a planet passes in front of a star as seen from the Earth, the event is called "transit".

Small faults in the brightness of a star during transit can help scientists determine the orbit and size of the planet, as well as the size of the star.

Based on these calculations, scientists can determine whether the planet sits in the "conducive zone" of the star, and therefore whether it can host the living conditions of aliens to grow.

Kepler was the first spacecraft to explore the planets in our galaxy, and over the years his remarks confirmed the existence of more than 2,600 exoplanets - many of which could be key targets in the quest for extraterrestrial life

Kepler was the first spacecraft to explore the planets in our galaxy, and over the years his remarks confirmed the existence of more than 2,600 exoplanets – many of which could be key targets in the quest for extraterrestrial life


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