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120 million years old dinosaur fossil with shark-like teeth discovered in Thailand



Researchers discovered a new species of predatory dinosaur in Thailand that had shark-like teeth. The newly discovered dinosaur, named Siamraptor suwati, was used to live on Earth approximately 120 million years ago during the Cretaceous period.

Steve Brusatte, a palaeontologist at the University of Edinburgh, told National Geographic that this is one of the most important Thai dinosaurs ever found. Researchers have found that this ancient giant belongs to the family of Carcharodontosauria, which is a group of dinosaurs from the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods.

It should be noted that unlike Tyrannosaurus rex or T.rex who used their jaws to crush Rey's bones, this newly found dinosaur had shark-like teeth. The members of this family were known for their sharp teeth, which were very useful to keep the flesh clean from their preys' bones.

The palaeontologists found the fossilized remains of four Siamraptor suwati individuals. During the excavation, they discovered the skull, backbone, limbs, and hips from the Khok Kruat Formation in Nakhon Ratchasima province, Thailand.

After polygenetic analysis of the fossil remains, Dr Duangsuda Chokchaloemwong of Nakhon Ratchasima Rajabhat University and other colleagues from Japan and Thailand revealed that "Siamraptor suwati is a basal species of Carcharodontosauria, incorporating a new view of the paleobiogeographical context of this group."

In addition, they also stated that this dinosaur species, "Siamraptor suwati is the best-preserved carcharodontosaurian theropod in Southeast Asia, and sheds new light on the early evolutionary history of Carcharodontosauria."

As per Dr Duangsuda Chokchaloemwong since this is the first evidence of the oldest carcharodontosaurian dinosaur found in this Southeast Asian region, the discovery will help Thai people realize that the country has so many fossils that it is yet to discover.

The study paper, which included all the recent findings, was published in the journal PLoS ONE.

Location map of new theropod material and stratigraphy of Khorat Group: A - map of Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Thailand; B - distribution map of the Khok Kruat Formation in Nakhon Ratchasima Province; C - enlarged locality map of Suranaree and Khok Kruat
Location map of new theropod material and stratigraphy of Khorat Group: A – map of Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Thailand; B – distribution map of the Khok Kruat Formation in Nakhon Ratchasima Province; C – enlarged locality map of Suranaree and Khok Kruat subdistricts with subdistrict boundaries; D – a photograph of the excavation site; E – stratigraphic column of the Khorat Group. A red-colored star indicates the new theropod locality, the dotted lines indicate the subdistrict boundaries, and the gray-colored lines indicate the roads in C, respectively.
Chokchaloemwong et al, doi: 10.1371 / journal.pone.0222489

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