Monday , January 18 2021

Duke Hernandez confirms support for the end of the Cuba-MLB pact



Orlando El Duque Hernandez welcomes end to Cuba-MLB deal

Orlando El Duque Hernandez, the Cuban ball legend, gives his estimate of the end of the deal and talks about his memories of the Cuban ballet, Yenkis and White Sox.

Orlando El Duque Hernandez, the Cuban ball legend, gives his estimate of the end of the deal and talks about his memories of the Cuban ballet, Yenkis and White Sox.

Although he understands the drama of the players on the list, Orlando El Duque Hernández applauds that the deal between the Cuban Federation and the main leagues has been canceled because it was based on a weak and false base.

Hernandez, perhaps the Cuban player who was most respected for his appearances on and off the island, repeated his position on several occasions and this Tuesday returned to comment on the debated topic of the Facebook El Vikingo and Ebro Live program.

"I congratulate the US government, Trump, for taking this decision to return this agreement to a lie," Hernandez said. "It's fake to say that the Baseball Federation of Cuba is independent. We all know it is not."

Signed in December 2018, an agreement between the FCB and Majorce ended with a dead letter on April 8, when the Treasury sent a letter to the major leagues to cancel their efforts to implement this agreement.

In this way, Donald Trump's administration has destroyed the directive of Barack Obama's previous government that recognized the FCB as an independent body of communist authorities in the country.

"If they are independent as they say, let's give them the benefit of suspicion, and the guys come out without restriction, at will and without keeping their passports," added El Duke. "They have a solution in their hands. Let them be free and make their own decisions."

The cancellation of the deal took place exactly the week after the FBI released the list of "released" players – under 25 and less than five national series – which will be taken into account by specialists' clubs.

Since its publication, the list has sparked an avalanche of controversy over the names of those who integrated it and those left out, according to parameters of eligibility that were never completely clear.

"If Cuba has only 34 players to watch, they are very bad in Cuba," said Hernandez, a four-time World Series winner, three with Yankee and one with White Sox. "Why not let the teams decide who they want or do not want to sign? Why not show it with complete freedom? Why should everything be reduced to that list?"

One of the greatest glasses of Industrialists of all time, Hernandez was the victim of one of the great injustices, when he was prevented to be one of the best anti-starred stars, to continue playing the ball, which forced him to leave his country from maritime

His story, worthy of the novel, is a legendary material from the way he arrived in New York and became a symbol for all Latin Americans, and especially for the Cubans.

"It's easy to lie to those young boys and the people of Cuba who they consider guilty [de la caída del pacto] it's the United States, "said El Duque." We know it's not so. It is a Cuban government that reduces these young boys to sports, medicine, all walks of life. He is already good with lies. & # 39; & # 39;


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