Wednesday , June 16 2021

The new shoe insert can treat diabetic foot ulceration



Researchers have developed a shoe insert that can facilitate the healing process for people who have developed ulcers due to diabetes.

Researchers have developed a shoe insert that can facilitate the healing process for people who have developed ulcers due to diabetes.

Diabetic ulcers are often the result of nerves that damage the blood sugar levels that tear off the feeling from the feet or feet.

"One way to treat these wounds is to give them oxygen," said Babak Ziaie, a professor at Purdue University in the USA.

"We have created a system that gradually releases oxygen throughout the day, so that the patient can have more mobility."

Without the ability to feel pain, strokes and tumors, they go unnoticed, and the skin tissue breaks down to form ulcers.

Lots of sugar in the blood, along with dried skin as a result of diabetes, further slows down the healing process of the ulcer.

Researchers used lasers to shape the silicone rubber in the inserts and then created oxygen-releasing tanks only in the part of the foot where the ulcer is located.

"Silicone is flexible and has good oxygen permeability," said Hongjie Jiang, post-doctoral scientist at the University.

"Laser treatment helps us fine-tune this permeability and targets a wound that is hypoxic instead of poisoning the rest of the foot with too much oxygen," Jiang added.

In an article published in the journal Materials Research Society Communications, the team said the pad could deliver oxygen at least eight hours a day under the pressure of a person weighing around 53-81 kg.

It can also be adapted to take any weight, says the study.

The team predicts that the manufacturer sends the patient a packet of previously filled inserts adapted to his wound site, based on the "wound profile" obtained from the doctor's prescription and photo of the foot.

"This is a massive adaptation at a low cost," said Vaibhav Jain, a researcher at Purdue.

The patent is waiting for the technology of inserts. The team is currently looking for corporate partners.


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