Friday , January 22 2021

Antares reached the launch pad in Virginia for a cargo mission to the space station – Spaceflight Now



The Northrop Grumman Rocket rocket, which is on the scene, slipped out of its horizontal southern integration facility Monday to cross the 0A footprint in the Mid Atlantic Regional Space Station in Virginia, where a space station delivery exercise was scheduled.

Driving self-propelled conveyors / erector along the two-lane track, the Antares rocket completed the journey one kilometer to the 0A ramp with a heavy trip to the ramp that led to the port for the port. Antares rocket 139 meters high (42.5 meters) was raised vertically to the 0A ramp for final checks before taking off on Monday night.

After passing a test for combined systems, in which engineers confirmed all the links between the Antares rocket, land systems, and the Cygnus supply ship, the launcher was restored horizontally Tuesday night to finally charge the load sensitive load.

The delay-loading procedure indicates the first time Northrop Grumman adds a time-sensitive load on the Cygnus spacecraft less than 24 hours before retreating. The ability allows teams to bring fresh food and research samples right before the launch, and teams plan to add a dwelling with mice to explore the immune system of the Lebedine spacecraft scheduled for Wednesday's abolition.

The launch of the cargo mission Norgor Grumman from the NG-11 is set at 4:46 am. EDT (2046 GMT) on Wednesday, and the shipping vessel should arrive at the space station on Friday.

Two RD-181 main engines, burning kerosene and liquid oxygen, will take the Antares launcher off the pad with approximately £ 864,000 per stroke.

Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals
Credit: NASA / Bill Ingals

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