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Extreme weather conditions turn Arctic BRANGE – and it can accelerate climate change



In recent years, Arctic scientists have come up with a surprising finding: large areas of the Arctic turn brown.

This is partly because of the extreme events associated with winter conditions, such as sudden, short-lived periods of extreme heat.

These events occur as the climate warms up, which happens twice as fast in the Arctic as compared to the rest of the planet.

Dead and brown vegetation at the grunt in Norway. The researcher, Sheffield, warned that bluffing occurs at an alarming rate, with ever-increasing effects that cause great death and damage to the planets.

Dead and brown vegetation at the grunt in Norway. The researcher, Sheffield, warned that bluffing occurs at an alarming rate, with ever-increasing effects that cause great death and damage to the planets.

Dead and brown vegetation at the grunt in Norway. The researcher, Sheffield, warned that bluffing occurs at an alarming rate, with ever-increasing effects that cause great death and damage to the planets.

TWO CULTURES OF THE ARCTIC THEM

"Frost drought" occurs when the insulating layer of snow that usually protects plants from the harsh Arctic winter melts, usually with unusually high winter temperatures.

If the plants remain exposed to cold, windy conditions for a long time, they constantly lose water and are unable to replace it from frozen soil.

Finally, they succumb to drought.

The second effect is "extreme winter warming" – a sudden surge of high temperatures during the winter, which melts the snow and tricks with evergreen plants in preparation for the spring, by rejecting their cold tolerance.

When warm weather is over, the return of cold temperatures usually kills the plant.

Therefore, extreme events occur more and more often, with ever-increasing effects – including widespread harm and death in Arctic plants.

This "hardening" of plant communities has happened over thousands of square kilometers or more.

However, until recently, we know very little about what this could mean for the balance between the penetration and release of carbon in the Arctic ecosystems.

Given that the Arctic has twice as much carbon as the atmosphere, this is a huge concern.

Now, our study has shown that extreme climate events can significantly reduce the ability of Arctic ecosystems to take coal – with implications for whether the Arctic will help fight climate change or accelerate it.

To understand how extreme events affect Arctic earthquakes, we traveled to the Lofoten Islands in northern Norway, where seaside, subarctic plant communities act as a blend of future climate change in the far north, by first showing the effects of warming in the region .

Here we find the effects of two extreme winter weather events.

First, the "drought from ice" caused an extensive plant.

Drought occurs when the insulating layer of snow that usually protects plants from the harsh Arctic winter melts, usually with unusually high winter temperatures.

If the plants remain exposed to cold, windy conditions for a long time, they constantly lose water and are unable to replace it from frozen soil.

NEW ARCTIC SHIPPING ROUTE COMES TO MILK NETWORKS

Denmark, A.P. Moller-Maersk, the largest shipping group in the world, said that one of its cargo ships managed to pass through the Russian Arctic on a one-off trial as a result of the melting of sea ice.

Pale Lauren, chief technical director of Maersk, said that "the trial allowed us to get an extremely operational experience".

Mr. Laursen adding Venta Maersk and all systems abroad is doing well in an unknown environment.

Melting ice in the Central Arctic Stephen Hendrix / Alfred Wegener / PA)

Melting ice in the Central Arctic Stephen Hendrix / Alfred Wegener / PA)

Melting ice in the Central Arctic Stephen Hendrix / Alfred Wegener / PA)

The world's largest freight forwarder is exploring the trade route through a "short route" across the Arctic, while warming global warming opens the infamous Northeast Passage.

Lauren said the ship arrived in St. Petersburg on Friday after leaving the Russian Pacific port city of Vladivostok on August 22nd.

The ship passes through Bering's territory on September 6th.

The North Sea Route may be a shorter path for trips from East Asia to Europe than moving northwest over Canada, as it is likely to be free of ice earlier due to climate change.

Finally, they succumb to drought.

The second event was "Extreme winter warming" – a sudden surge of high temperatures during the winter, which melts the snow and ticks evergreen plants in preparation for the spring, with the rejection of their cold tolerance.

When warm weather is over, the return of cold temperatures usually kills the plant.

In this case, however, we found something unexpected.

Hitland's plants survived this extreme winter warming, but they showed evidence of severe stress, visible as a deep, permanent reddish-brown color in the shoots and leaves.

Deep red pigmentation shows that this plant is under stress from the unpredictable climate.

Deep red pigmentation shows that this plant is under stress from the unpredictable climate.

Deep red pigmentation shows that this plant is under stress from the unpredictable climate.

We measure how much carbon dioxide was taken and released by plants in three types of vegetation: a damaged sight (where the dominant evergreen species were killed by a grim drought), highlighted the healthy and healthy green health that escaped the effects of an extreme event.

This was done in three measurement periods during the growing season.

We found that these extreme winter conditions reduced how much carbon was absorbed in the Gothic ecosystems to 50% during the entire growing season.

This is a huge reduction in the ability of the widespread Arctic ecosystem to remove carbon from the atmosphere.

Surprisingly, this was the case in the damaged county, where much of the vegetation was killed, and in an emphasized sight.

Although the processes that lead this change differ in each type of sight, this clearly shows that we should consider the role of plant stress in limiting the taking of carbon from plants to appreciate the consequences of extreme climate events.

More traditional artichoke tundra

More traditional artichoke tundra

More traditional artichoke tundra

What does that mean for the Arctic? We now know that extreme climate events could significantly reduce the ability of Arctic ecosystems to take carbon and fight climate change.

This is particularly worrisome because the browning impact is in contrast to those of a better understandable response to Arctic ecosystems of climate change: "Arctic greening," or the tendency of plants to become higher and more productive, such as hot summer summers.

Instruments for measuring carbon penetration and release of the test site.

Instruments for measuring carbon penetration and release of the test site.

Instruments for measuring carbon penetration and release of the test site.

Many climate models currently presume arbitrary levels of greening across the Arctic, and therefore Arctic ecosystems will take more carbon in the future – slowing down climate change.

The browning volume we have seen in recent years, combined with the negative impacts on carbon capture, which is published here, suggests that reality may be more complicated, and this raises questions about our understanding of the role of the Arctic in the Earth's climate.

What does this mean for us? The impact of extreme weather events in the Arctic has global consequences.

It is clear that our current efforts to tackle climate change are dangerously inadequate, but ambitious action can now reduce how much the Arctic is expected to warm by as much as 7 ° C.

This is crucial for minimizing the impacts of climate change both in the Arctic ecosystems and around the world.


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