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13 cases confirmed: an outpatient clinic for children in Graz is fighting against chickenpox



Not knowing, the 15-year-old son presented the measles virus in the infirmary for children in Graz, Austria. It's about two and a half weeks, meanwhile, it's clear: the boy infected at least 13 children and babies.

More fears were feared

Since it may take up to three weeks to get the disease out, several cases are expected. There may also be contagion in other medical practices or clinics. At least 28 babies are currently being treated with suspected measles in Graz.

Andrea Grissold from the Austrian Morbili Committee explains: "If you have had a contact, then you should check as soon as possible in your vaccination record whether you are vaccinated twice or have a valid immunity status. This is a blood sample that allows you to check if you are protected within a few hours. If not, you should be vaccinated within 72 hours. "

The number of cases of measles in Europe has increased

The measles are very infectious. One who has never had an illness or has not been vaccinated is endangered. The number of cases of measles in Europe has risen dramatically in recent years. In Europe, there were 35 measles in Europe in 2017. In part, the number of vaccine reviewers is increasing: for example, in Poland, for example, last year, citizens declared the International Day against Vaccine Damage.

In Germany, a panel of experts, the Standing Committee on Vaccination (STICO), regularly recommends which vaccines should be made by citizens: The combined vaccine, which protects against measles, mumps and rubella, is a solid part of the recommendation for vaccination for years. For this reason, immunization among the population is relatively high – if not high enough. The goal is to eliminate smallpox. The situation is similar in Austria, where immunization has grown steadily in recent years.

The first symptoms are often similar to those of cold: fever, runny nose and cough. Typically, the brown-pink rash often follows only a few days later. In case of suspected measles, it is advised to contact your family doctor or emergency department by telephone to avoid infecting other patients.


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