Tuesday , June 22 2021

New trials highlight the complexity of the warming and melting of Antarctica [Report]



In a study published on Natural climate changeToday, scientists draw from recent findings to emphasize the multilayered dynamics of melting surface in Antarctica. The authors of the study come from Columbia University Earth Observatory Lamont Doherty, Cooperative Institute of Environmental Science Research at the University of Colorado Boulder and Rowan University.


Antarctica is often regarded as a cold, high and dry place – all of which is, of course, valid for the country's largest ice, which currently locates about 58 meters from the level of the sea level. However, recent studies suggest that in the future, much of the Antarctic ice surface will melt. Whether this new water collects in lakes, moves in rivers or is absorbed into the nearby snow surface as a sponge, it has huge consequences for rising sea levels around the world.

Today, Antarctica loses most of its frosty mass with melting from the bottom up from the ocean and from the breakup of icebergs. But recent surveys are increasingly suggesting that it may not always be the case. While global temperatures continue to rise, Antarctica can gradually face top-down ice losses due to the warming atmosphere. In fact, recent modeling work has shown that it can actually be a hotter atmosphere that fosters Antarctica's main contribution to sea-level rise over the course of this century. This modeling work has been enhanced by observations in recent decades in the Antarctic Peninsula, where several radiating fractures have broken up due to warmer air that causes more melting of the surface. This melting created large lake lake lakes that caused the ice shelves to break and break up. After this interruption occurs, the ice from the Antarctic is accelerating in the ocean.

However, in our continuous development of the understanding of the production of melt in the Antarctic, the authors also show that the warming atmosphere is just one thought; wind and feedback from local scales can be even more important for driving down the road. For example, this hotter atmosphere can lead to more snowfall, which, possibly counterintuitive, can also suppress melting, and at the same time create more sponge-layer than a sponge to absorb melt water.

Understanding what happens to the melting of water after forming is a critical issue that needs to be addressed. Science received an insight from Greenland, where much more melting of the surface is happening today. For example, in Greenland, we know that milk water can be penetrated through the snow and thrown into the underground, forming huge purificant aquifers. If such features begin to form on the Antarctic ice shelf, they could endanger the future stability of ice. However, Antarctic ice shelves are not the only thing we need to worry about in the future. If there is enough melting on the surface of the Antarctic ground ice, part of this water could make it to the ice base and affect the flow of ice in the ocean, as it already does under much of the Greenland ice sheet.

Finally, the authors argue that resolving how Antarctica responds to climate change is an increasingly complex task and create new issues and an urgent need for a common, multidisciplinary and international effort. They write that observations are needed today from the terrain and space, and it is imperative that the ice sheet and climate models represent the various processes that affect the melting and hydrology of the Antarctic. Because of the potential of the Antarctic to significantly change the global sea level, these are very important concerns that require increased scientific focus.

More information:
Robin E. Belle et al. The hydrology of the Antarctic surface and the impact on the mass mass of ice, Natural climate change (2018). DOI: 10.1038 / s41558-018-0326-3

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In a study published on Natural climate changeToday, scientists draw from recent findings to emphasize the multilayered dynamics of melting surface in Antarctica. The authors of the study come from Columbia University Earth Observatory Lamont Doherty, Cooperative Institute of Environmental Science Research at the University of Colorado Boulder and Rowan University.

Antarctica is often regarded as a cold, high and dry place – all of which is, of course, valid for the country's largest ice, which currently locates about 58 meters from the level of the sea level. However, recent studies suggest that in the future, much of the Antarctic ice surface will melt. Whether this new water collects in lakes, moves in rivers or is absorbed into the nearby snow surface as a sponge, it has huge consequences for rising sea levels around the world.

Today, Antarctica loses most of its frosty mass with melting from the bottom up from the ocean and from the breakup of icebergs. But recent surveys are increasingly suggesting that it may not always be the case. While global temperatures continue to rise, Antarctica can gradually face top-down ice losses due to the warming atmosphere. In fact, recent modeling work has shown that it can actually be a hotter atmosphere that fosters Antarctica's main contribution to sea-level rise over the course of this century. This modeling work has been enhanced by observations in recent decades in the Antarctic Peninsula, where several radiating fractures have broken up due to warmer air that causes more melting of the surface. This melting created large lake lake lakes that caused the ice shelves to break and break up. After this interruption occurs, the ice from the Antarctic is accelerating in the ocean.

However, in our continuous development of the understanding of the production of melt in the Antarctic, the authors also show that the warming atmosphere is just one thought; wind and feedback from local scales can be even more important for driving down the road. For example, this hotter atmosphere can lead to more snowfall, which, possibly counterintuitive, can also suppress melting, and at the same time create more sponge-layer than a sponge to absorb melt water.

Understanding what happens to the melting of water after forming is a critical issue that needs to be addressed. Science received an insight from Greenland, where much more melting of the surface is happening today. For example, in Greenland, we know that milk water can be penetrated through the snow and thrown into the underground, forming huge purificant aquifers. If such features begin to form on the Antarctic ice shelf, they could endanger the future stability of ice. However, Antarctic ice shelves are not the only thing we need to worry about in the future. If there is enough melting on the surface of the Antarctic ground ice, part of this water could make it to the ice base and affect the flow of ice in the ocean, as it already does under much of the Greenland ice sheet.

Finally, the authors argue that resolving how Antarctica responds to climate change is an increasingly complex task and create new issues and an urgent need for a common, multidisciplinary and international effort. They write that observations are needed today from the terrain and space, and it is imperative that the ice sheet and climate models represent the various processes that affect the melting and hydrology of the Antarctic. Because of the potential of the Antarctic to significantly change the global sea level, these are very important concerns that require increased scientific focus.

More information:
Robin E. Belle et al. The hydrology of the Antarctic surface and the impact on the mass mass of ice, Natural climate change (2018). DOI: 10.1038 / s41558-018-0326-3

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