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Jupiter is still recovering from a colossal collision 4.5 years ago



Jupiter "itemprop =" image "data-jadewitsmedia =" status "status": & # 39; success & # 39;, & # 39; id & # 39 ;: & # 39; 190437 & # 39;, & # 39; ext & # 39 ;: & # 39; jpg & # 39;, & # 39; thumb & # 39 ;: & # 39; // en.prothomalo.com/ content / cache / images / 110x110x1 / settings / media / 2019/08/17 / 9b5e93bf9ef8c941a7aec16b7ee94a70-Jupiter.jpg & # 39;, & # 39; path & # 39;: & # 39; media / 2019/08/17 / 9b5e93bf9ef8c941a7aec16b7ee94a70 & # 39; & # 39; & # 39; & # 39; uper Jupiter & # 39 ;, & # 39; pushClass & # 39 ;: & # 39; jwMediaContent & # 39;, & # 39; type & # 39 ;: & # 39; picture & # 39;, & # 39; width & # 39;: & # 39; 644 & # 39;, & # 39; link & # 39 ;: & # 39; & # 39 ;, & # 39; goal & # 39;: & # 39; & # 39 ;, & # 39; title & # 39;: & # 39; Jupiter & # 39;, & # 39; title & # 39;: & # 39; & # 39 ;, & # 39; alt & # 39;: & # 39; Jupiter & # 39;, & # 39; height & # 39;: & # 39; & # 39 ;, & # 39; alignment & # 39;: & # 39; & # 39;} "width =" 644 "src =" https://en.prothomalo.com/contents/cache /images/644x0x1/uploads/media/2019/08/17/9b5e93bf9ef8c941a7aec16b7ee94a70-Jupiter.jpg "/> A colossal, head-on collision between Jupiter and a still-formed planet in the early solar system, about 4.5 billion years ago, has left Jupiter's nucleus less dense and wider than expected, researchers say.</p><p>Even if this impact occurred 4.5 billion years ago, "it could take many, many billions of years for the heavy material to settle into a dense core under the circumstances suggested by the paper," say researchers who analyzed readings from NASA's Juno Spacecraft. spacecraft.</p><p>Astronomers at Rice University and China's Sun Yat-sen University say their impact scenario may explain previously confusing gravitational readings of oon.</p><p>"This is confusing. It indicates that something has happened to the nucleus, and this is where the huge impact begins to play, "said Rice's study astronomer and co-author Andrea Isela in a paper published in the journal Nature.</p><p>Isela said that the leading theories of planet formation suggested that Jupiter began as a dense, rocky or icy planet that later picked up its dense atmosphere from the primeval disk of gas and dust that gave birth to our sun.</p><p>Isela said he was skeptical when lead author of the study, Yang-Fei Liu, first proposed the idea that the data could be explained by the huge impact the Jupiter core is having, mixing the dense contents of its core with less dense layers.</p><p>The research team ran thousands of computer simulations and discovered that the fast-growing Jupiter could disrupt the orbits of nearby "planetary embryos", protoplasts that were in the early stages of planet formation.</p><p>The collision scenario became even more attractive after Liu ran 3D computer models that showed how the collision would affect Jupiter's core.</p><p>"Because it is dense and comes with a lot of energy, the impact would be like a bullet going through the atmosphere and hitting the base," Isela said.</p><p>"Before the impact, you have a very dense core, surrounded by atmosphere. The impact on the head is spreading things, diluting the core. "</p><p>"The only scenario that resulted in a density profile of a nucleus, similar to what Juno is measuring today, is a stroke with a planetary embryo about 10 times as massive as Earth," Liu said.</p><p>The Juno mission was designed to help scientists better understand the origin and evolution of Jupiter.</p><p>The spacecraft, launched in 2011, carries instruments to map Jupiter's gravitational and magnetic fields and examine the deep, inner structure of the planet.</p></div><p><script>(function(d, s, id) {
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