Saturday , June 12 2021

Infants born of elective c-sections are more likely to be overweight



A new study found babies born of elective - but not extraordinary - cesarean section are more likely to be overweight of a 1-year-old mark.

123RF

A new study found babies born of elective – but not extraordinary – cesarean section are more likely to be overweight of a 1-year-old mark.

Babies born from an election cesarean section are more likely to be overweight than they will turn 1, according to a new study from the University of Auckland.

Researchers are urging healthcare professionals to discuss the choice of elections more thoroughly after the study, as it may have long-term effects on children.

Caesarean rates have doubled over the past two decades, with an increase in the number of these patients who are elective rather than extraordinary.

Causal emergencies occur due to medical complications occurring during labor, while the choice is the choice made and performed before the commencement of labor.

READ MORE:
* C-parts related to health problems
* Fear is accused of increasing electoral C-sections
* After-effects of caesarean section

Caesarean delivery in general is associated with obesity in early childhood, but the causes of this relationship are not yet understood, researchers say.

Professor Sir Peter Gluckman of the University of Auckland, based at the Liggins Institute, was part of an international research team. (Photo file).

ROBERT KITCHIN / STUFF

Professor Sir Peter Gluckman of the University of Auckland, based at the Liggins Institute, was part of an international research team. (Photo file).

A new study, published in JAMA Network Open Thursday, is based on data from the current Singapore Diet Development Study on Health Results (GUSTO).

The International Research Team analyzes data from 727 babies and their mothers.

Almost one third of babies are born through a cesarean section, and a third of them are elective. The researchers compare the body mass index in babies born from elective and extraordinary cesarean section against babies born vaginal when they reached the 12-month mark.

It was found that 12.2 per cent of babies who were selected from Caesarean section were overweight or at risk of this condition, compared to only 2.3 per cent of babies born in Caesarean section.

The mother's ethnicity, age, education, body mass index, smoking, blood pressure and gestational diabetes were factored and the relationship remained the same.

Professor Sir Peter Gluckman, from the University of Auckland, based at the Liggins Institute, was part of the research team and said that the difference in body weight could be related to not going through labor stress.

The number of babies born of elective cesarean section has increased in the last decade.

GETTY IMAGES

The number of babies born of elective cesarean section has increased in the last decade.

"The most likely explanation is that infants born of elective cesarean section are not exposed to their mother's bacteria, as they normally occur during labor, nor are they subjected to stress related to labor."

Other evidence suggests the mothers' bacteria and the increased hormone in the baby due to stress of labor, helped to put babies on a developmental path to a healthy weight in childhood.

Babies born through an emergency cesarean section have generally experienced a certain workforce, Gluckman said.

"The membrane that surrounds the uterus is interrupted, allowing the native bacteria inside."

Election cesarean section was a "growing epidemic," Gluckman said.

"This study flashes a flag – this is a social trend, not a health trend – and it's not without some potential expenses for the baby."

It is important to note, however, Gluckman said that when it comes to cesarean section used for medical reasons, there should be no hesitation.

"In such circumstances it is best for the mother and for the baby."


Source link