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Cheap Alcohol is the "Real Problem" That Brings Student Flat Entertainment to Culture



Cheap drinks drives Dunidin's student culture as part of the party and provokes discussions on how to reduce the alcohol-related damage.

The evidence – crumpled cans, broken glass – lies in the streets of the student quarter.

This week the area is due to major landscaping, at the request of Sofia Crestani's parents, who died at a party Saturday night.

Students watch rapper Arce perform before Six60 takes the stage for their surprise performance at St Castle, Dunedin. The balcony in the complex will be demolished later.

MICHAEL ONE / WIN

Students watch rapper Arce perform before Six60 takes the stage for their surprise performance at St Castle, Dunedin. The balcony in the complex will be demolished later.

Hundreds of cans and bottles were out of the flat Dandas fire, flat, called Manor, early Sunday morning.

Several hundred people were in the apartment when the campus clock – and then its residents – called on police to shut the party out of control.

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Sunday at Oriental Party on Hyde Street, a street of many student housing in Dunedin.

SUBMITTED

Sunday at Oriental Party on Hyde Street, a street of many student housing in Dunedin.

An investigation into the death of a 19-year-old is under way, but the student's drinking culture is already in the spotlight.

That culture has not been encouraged by the University of Otago, which has sought to reduce alcohol-related harm by reinforcing the Student Code, deploying a campus clock and banning alcohol advertising on campus.

Their work, in particular that of the Protector and Student Association of the University of Otago (OUSA), won praise from Sergeant Jean Pauline, chief of police in Dunedin, police for the prevention of alcohol damage.

Students dressed as former resident of Dunedin, David Bain, at the 2018 Hyde St. annual party.

Jamish McNeilly / STUC

Students dressed as former resident of Dunedin, David Bain, at the 2018 Hyde St. annual party.

Despite their efforts, "the real issue is the price of alcohol," Paulin said.

Cheap alcohol without licenses – compared to the price of alcohol in bars – "drives the great culture of flat parties," Paulin said.

At a liquor store – just a few hundred yards from campus – it was not uncommon to see large lines forming around peak times; especially O-Sunday and the Hyde St.

Moments before Six60 performances at 2016's St. Dunidin Castle.

Hamish McNeilly / Stuff

Moments before Six60 performances at 2016's St. Dunidin Castle.

FEATURES OF CONNECTION

Some argue the university is guilty of closing some of the well-known student irrigation holes, but it is a "persistent urban myth", said Vice Chancellor Charlene Jane.

Those bars were on the open market for "lack of financial sustainability", with one owner even approaching the university to take over the business.

Vice President of the University of Otago, Professor Charlene Jane, says that in order to effectively intervene to minimize the harm from alcohol, the university "has withdrawn all available levers".

Alan Dove / shipped

Vice President of the University of Otago, Professor Charlene Jane, says that in order to effectively intervene to minimize the harm from alcohol, the university "has withdrawn all available levers".

That bar, thought to be a former Garden Tavern, is now a student center on the infamous St. North Castle, while late last year OUSA took over ownership of the "Home Bar", known to generations of former students as Oriental. .

Previously stated the former owner of the bar Things he closed the bars because they became an inexpensive service for drunk students, who spent about $ 4 per head.

Jane agreed with Paulin that one of the major contributors to alcohol-related harm in New Zealand is the availability of cheap alcohol, which "can be consumed in places that are not licensed, without supervision."

Cavinda Herat / Things

University of Otago Vice Chancellor Charlene Jane and Otago University Student Association President James Heath addressed the media after the death of sophomore Sofia Crestani.

While drinking in student dorms was "not new," the mechanisms that historically prevented dangerous drinking – including closing hours, higher costs and limited access to physical money, were no longer factors, Shane said.

"All of these problems are exacerbated in the case of young people, whose risk / reward rates are very different from those of older adults.

"Taken together, these variables create the perfect storm for alcohol-related damage."

Police in front of Danedin's apartment on Dandas Street, where Sofia Crestani died in an apparent stampede.

Hamish McNeilly / Staff

Police in front of Danedin's apartment on Dandas Street, where Sofia Crestani died in an apparent stampede.

But that was not the subject of discussion for the lobby group, the Alcohol Drinks Council in New Zealand. Statements by CEO Bridget McDonald Things "Out of respect for family, friends and the community in connection with the recent tragic event in Dunedin, and given that it is under police investigation, we will not comment."

It is worth noting that a decades-long study of student drinking in Otago, published last year, showed that while the proportion of alcohol drinkers did not change, the percentage who drank intoxication was significantly lower in 2014 than in 2004.

The intoxication rate decreased from 45% in 2004 to 33% in 2014.

Misbehavior, at least with the couch of fire, once synonymous with the Scarf culture, has also come down. Firefighters in the city previously dealt with dozens of couch fires during each Orientation, this year attending a solitary call.

The presence of the Clock Campus and the threat of disciplinary action are likely to have affected, as always the watchful eyes of CCTV cameras operating in the area.

TRAGIC HISTORY

Despite all these efforts to reduce the damage, tragic incidents such as the mortality of the manor stairs and the collapse of the balcony of the Six60 secret concert have occurred.

In 2017, police decided not to file a criminal complaint for the collapse of the balcony, which left 18 injured, after a report by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment revealed that the balcony had given way due to "grand level" loads.

Police report obtained by Things they noticed people on the balcony, some of whom were unfamiliar with the apartment but did not commit any illegal act.

While some questioned Campus View's role in Manor, Proctor Dave Scott acknowledged that his staff had no authority to enter privately, nor had the power to shut down entertainment.

In addition to monitoring parties and working with hosts, they could alert other authorities, such as noise control or police, if the party starts getting out of hand.

With regard to effective intervention to minimize the harm from alcohol, the university "has withdrawn all the levers at its disposal," Jane said.

HEPA ALCOHOL BAMINA

That left only changes to the legislation, with the tertiary institution having "multiple discussions with politicians on the issue of alcohol-related harm".

To reduce harmful drinking, "we need a combination of lesser availability and making alcohol less acceptable."

"Any increase in the price of alcohol will reduce consumption and reduce harm. There is infinite evidence that this is true. Consumption decreases every time the price goes up. "

In a submission on the 2010 Alcohol Reform Bill, the university called for the age of alcohol to be at least 20 years old for both permit and license premises.

It also demanded a reduction in trading time when alcohol could be sold and highlighted "aggressive pricing / discount strategies", especially in supermarkets located outside the student area.

"With these low prices, it is common to see more wheelchair-bound alcohol in wheelchairs being carried to dormitories across North Dunedin," the petition said.

To counter pre-loading, the university demanded a minimum price and restricted the alcohol content of RTD.

While much of the law was exhausted, Shane would "welcome further discussion with the Government on ways they could work with us to reduce alcohol-related harms not only in our community but throughout New Zealand."

And that's a conversation, Dunedin North MP David Clark was ready to have, telling Things he and Jane worked together on alcohol problems and student impact.

"I am absolutely open to discussing this further with her."


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