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The woman thinks she is entering menopause – she has almost died



Symptoms are not always easy to interpret: Sudden hot flashes have made the American as a menopause. But then she fainted – and her life almost suffered a tragic end.

It was clear to 46-year-old Pennsylvania Middress in Pennsylvania: Sudden sweating and a feeling of toothache are a sign of menopause. Every woman comes to this point: menopause is the end of the fertile phase, hormone change leads to more or less serious symptoms.

Warm lashes, sweating, sleep disturbances, depressive moods and nervousness are typical symptoms of menopause – but not every woman has to meet. Contrary to her assumption, Essessica Midur did not suffer from menopausal symptoms: she had a life-threatening condition.

Urinary tract infection with life-threatening consequences

"I took my mother to the hospital to be operated on when I was suddenly very hot – but I thought it was just a climate-warm glow," British news portal Mirror quoted US-American: "The nurse noticed that I was sweating and looking sick and told myself to go to the emergency roombut I didn't listen. But when I tried to get up, I failed. "

Midur was examined immediately and doctors diagnosed a urinary tract infection, which resulted in septic shock – meaning life-threatening. Middur was treated for weeks in the hospital with success. But only half a year later she revived: "When I was finally allowed to go home, I hoped it was over, and I went back to work – but six months later, the same symptoms as a wave came over me and when I arrived at the hospital, I was again diagnosed with sepsis. and every time Middour was lucky.

Read also: Shocking: What this woman wears in the intensive care unit is used by almost every woman,

Properly interpret the symptoms of sepsis

Although Middur has had to quit her job at the bank: She suffers from the consequences, constant joint pain and concentration problems – but she lives on. And she wants to sensitize them to the story that patients should question medical diagnoses: "I hope through my story I will create awareness that something very serious is behind the complaints and can I want to encourage people to call a sepsis doctorOpposite the mirror, she says she could have died three times if the sepsis had not been detected early and had not been in the right place at the right time.

In the video: These signs could indicate sepsis

Sepsis is caused by certain pathogenic microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses, fungi and other microorganisms, as Technique Crankenase reports. These enter the bloodstream through inflammation or injury, where they can cause simple or severe sepsis. At worst, it's a septic shockwhich should be treated immediately in the intensive care unit.

The following symptoms may indicate sepsis:

  • high temperature with fever, but also low temperature
  • palpitations
  • accelerated breathing
  • Blood pressure drop

Read also: Woman is fighting for cystitis for her life – this disturbing reason is behind her.

JG

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