Saturday , April 17 2021

"We Need Help": Growing waters are causing emergency evacuations across eastern Canada



Montreal Mayor Valerie Plant declared a state of emergency to predict what could happen.

Paul Chiasson / The Canadian Press

The water is rising rapidly in the flooded areas of Ottawa to Montreal and vast areas north and south, placing thousands of homes under threat and causing emergency evacuations and requests for help from local authorities.

Dry Magic earlier this week offered the hope that water levels in East Ontario and western Quebec could stabilize under the record-breaking catastrophe of 2017. These hopes were destroyed on Friday when heavy rains fell with a forecast of up to 50 millimeters through Saturday, adding already high levels of water and snow melting.

Part of the river Sv. Lawrence and the Ottawa River were designed to reach the level of 2017 early Saturday morning. The Ottawa could reach 50 centimeters above the levels in 2017, damaging 5,371 homes and forced 4,000 people to seek a high ground. Water is not expected to rain before Monday or Tuesday.

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A group of local leaders from 10 small-sized community bedrooms, west of Montreal, pleaded for help from the province on Friday afternoon, saying a flood of overflowing floods over the past 10 days would turn into a greater disaster. "In the coming days, we ourselves will need to evacuate 1,000 people. This is huge," said Patrick Bouzz, head of the regional council of Voodreil-Souulange. "We need help".

The catastrophe appears in a number of small pockets of 1,000 kilometers from the house of the house Brysbridge, Ont. to the strongly populated St. Lawrence and Fredericton and St. John. However, he has already hit Quebec hardest and the province faces the greatest fresh threat.

About 3,018 houses were already flooded in 42 municipalities in Quebec and in 1110 left their homes on Friday. In New Brunswick, nearly 1,000 people voluntarily evacuated homes, and 400 reside in temporary hotel homes provided by the Canadian Red Cross. However, about 1,000 people returned to their homes later this week, along the Chaudière River in eastern Quebec, where floods hit the fastest.

In Montreal, only 49 homes were damaged on Friday, but Mayor Valery Plant declared a state of emergency for what might come.

About 400 soldiers moved to Ottawa to help with their emergency, to eradicate and potential evacuations. On the side of Gatino in the capital, where 240 houses were flooded on Friday, mayor Maxim Pédnoud-Yobin was preparing for the worst. "What we expect in the coming days, we have never seen before," said the mayor.

One factor that complicates things compared to 2017 is that dozens of smaller rivers flowing from the north break all flood records. Among them is the Ruzh River, where authorities closely watched the small hydroelectric dam in Bel Falls, Que. Rapid water emerged from the structure and caused an automatic evacuation in an emergency of about 66 homes and cottages.

Montreal Announces Emergency, Canadian Forces Arrive in Ottawa, As Flood Waters Boost

The water level has exceeded the 1,000-year dams for the dam, but representatives of Hydro-Quebec said they are confident that they will retain it. The structure, known as the dam on the river, has no reservoir and has a relatively small amount of water compared to the big dams. But a complete failure will still send about 2.5 meters of water downstream. Transport Minister Québec, François Bonnardel, said the main risk is that high-speed water can wash motorways.

The warning for the dam led to the severity of the situation, even if few are directly threatened, according to Mark Olivier Labelle, mayor of the small town of Saint-André d'Argenteuil about 50 km. "It really has struck people's imaginations. We have a lot easier time to persuade them to leave," he said. Water is also cooler than it was in 2017, raising the risk of efforts to alleviate and preserve the morale of workers, he said.

Marie-Pierre Chalifu, who built a temporary wall wall with 4,000 sandbags to protect her coast home in the city, does not go anywhere. She expects water to spoil the level in 2017 early Saturday morning, but says she believes her fortress will be held. "I had 40 friends who worked two days to build it," she said. "I'm happy to have many good friends."

In New Brunswick, the waterfront in the Fredericton area has remained relatively stable and hopes to quit soon. However, Jan Hubbard, an environmental meteorologist and climate change expert in Canada, said rain combined with winds of up to 60 mph and thunderstorms are expected to exacerbate the conditions in the flood zones around Fredericton and St. John.

Up to 44 millimeters of rain can fall until midnight on Saturday, while emergency response officials warned residents not to expect water drops by early next week. "Now is not the time to relax," said Stacey Lyleling, director of emergency operations at New Brunswick.

TOTAL EXPECTED PRELIMINATION

About this weekend

Flood alerts are in place for much of Central

and Eastern Canada, starting on Friday at 3:22 am.

to 30

25 to 40

25 to 50

30 to 60

10 to 15

15 to 20

20 to 30

may exceed 50 mm

in local areas

CARRIE COCKBURN / GLOBE AND MAIL,

SOURCE: THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA

TOTAL EXPECTED PRELIMINATION

About this weekend

Flood alerts are in place for much of Central

and Eastern Canada, starting on Friday at 3:22 am.

can overcome

50 mm in local

areas

to 30

25 to 40

25 to 50

30 to 60

10 to 15

15 to 20

20 to 30

CARRIE COCKBURN / GLOBE AND MAIL,

SOURCE: THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA

TOTAL EXPECTED RECOMMENDATION FOR THIS WEEKEND

Flood alerts apply to most of Central and Eastern Canada, starting on Friday at 3:22 am.

can overcome

50 mm in local

areas

10 to 15

15 to 20

20 to 30

to 30

25 to 40

25 to 50

30 to 60

CARRIE COCKBURN / GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA

Part of the Transcanada highway between Fredericton and Moncton, which was closed on Wednesday evening, remains under water. The trucks and passengers trying to make their way between the two cities are forced to move 90 kilometers. A total of 88 roads in the province have been closed due to floods.

In St. John, four communities are "completely isolated" from the mainland by floods, said Kevin Clifford, fire chief and director of the Emergency Management Organization in St. John. In and around that city, more than 25,000 sandbags are distributed.

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Federal and provincial leaders visited the hit and threatened areas and offered support.

Prime Minister Doug Ford of Ontario dropped into a rural area west of Ottawa and called on volunteers to help with sandbags. The situation "only knocks down your heart," he said. Governor-General Julie Payette tour the St. John's watershed, along with Prime Minister Blair Higgs.

Federal Minister for Public Safety and Emergency preparedness, Ralf Gudele, who briefed reporters during his ride to Regina, said federal aid was available and his officials worked closely with provinces and local governments. More troops, fishing resources and coast guard were available to help, he said.

Mr Gudelle wrapped up his briefing on the positive news, saying that while Manitoba is experiencing some local floods, "a very significant risk of serious floods" south of Winnipeg has not happened.


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