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Waiting time is wiped out for personal care beds



Waiting for personal care waiting long home beds in Vinipeg seem to be something of the past – at least for now.

This week there are 165 free beds in the 38 licensed homes in the city, the regional health organization of Vinipeg said. It is a job rate of about 3 percent. That was the last March.

In the past, the job vacancy rate is less than one percent, with as many as 100 or more older people taking beds in local hospitals while waiting to be placed in long-term care, and another 200 or more homes are waiting for a place.

WRHA says several recent events have given the breathing system. In autumn 2017, the local healthcare system began offering improved home care for older people with high needs, in order to keep them in the homes longer. He also developed a rapid response program to help patients in their homes after being discharged from the hospital.

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Waiting for personal care waiting long home beds in Vinipeg seem to be something of the past – at least for now.

This week there are 165 free beds in the 38 licensed homes in the city, the regional health organization of Vinipeg said. It is a job rate of about 3 percent. That was the last March.

In the past, the job vacancy rate is less than one percent, with as many as 100 or more older people taking beds in local hospitals while waiting to be placed in long-term care, and another 200 or more homes are waiting for a place.

WRHA says several recent events have given the breathing system. In autumn 2017, the local healthcare system began offering improved home care for older people with high needs, in order to keep them in the homes longer. He also developed a rapid response program to help patients in their homes after being discharged from the hospital.

Also, in 2017, WRHA signed a two-year contract with a private company, "All Sisters Care", to provide transitional care for patients leaving the hospital. The company opened 65 transitional beds in Winnipeg, the price of which is 4.6 million dollars a year. Patients who are unable to return home are placed in the home care clinic or in another long-term care facility.

Christa Williams, Chief Health Officer for the Regional Health Service of Winnipeg

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Christa Williams, Chief Health Officer for the Regional Health Service of Winnipeg

Christa Williams, chief medical officer for WRHA health operations, said these initiatives dramatically reduced waiting lists.

"It is a combination of all those improved community supporters who have really led to a reduction in the number of people waiting for beds for PSP and increasing vacancies, because we better support individuals in the community," she said.

A study by the Canadian Health Information Institute in 2017 estimated that 20 to 30 per cent of long-term careers should not be in such institutions, and the decision to put patients at the elderly home is often delayed.

It seems that the WRHA is making some progress in dealing with this issue. A year ago, she announced that she had sharply reduced the number of patients who took hospital beds while waiting for the bed for care. This week, that number is sitting at 25. It's four times as big.

Williams said that the reason for the elderly in hospital all these days, while waiting for the PLEF bed, is because families are looking for an opening in a particular home. If the wait is long, the institution will work with the family to find a temporary location, she said.

There are about 100 elderly people living at home waiting for a home care service. Again, the main reason is that customers and their families have their own sights set up at a particular location. Williams said that if the client's situation deteriorated rapidly, WRHA could work with the family to find a home for temporary care.

Jan Lezheros, executive director of the Manitoba Long-term and Continuous Care Association, welcomed local efforts to ensure that only those who really need a bed for personal care are accepted.

She said the current rate of free rates in the Winnipeg homes of three percent is "probably a bit more than we would like to see", but it is unlikely that they will not be unused for very long.

With the rapid aging of the population, the need for beds for care homes will only increase, said Lezheros.

"Outside of Winnipeg there are still many, very long waiting lists for personal care beds," she said, especially in the Interlak Regional Health Institution.

"Beyond Winnipeg there are still many, very long waiting lists for personal care home beds." – Jan Lezheros, executive director of the Association for Long-term and Continuous Care in Manitoba

She said there have been talks between the two health authorities for transferring patients to Winnipeg, while the city has an excess of space, and this has happened in several cases.

Vinipeg has 5,665 beds in 38 licensed homes.

In 2013, the Center for Health Policy in Manitoba published a study that says that Manitoba will need an additional 5,100 to 6,300 homes for personal care or housing support homes by 2036. The same report says that Winnipeg is unlikely to start to face a high demand for beds by 2021.

Critics say the Palister's government is moving too slowly to secure new spaces for the PKP. The government has set a limit on how much money will contribute to a new facility, which has forced some projects to return to the drawing.

The expansion of the Holy Family Home in Winnipeg will add 41 beds in the system until spring. A government spokesman said Wednesday that the province is considering "active proposals" for additional 360 beds in Steinbach, Karman and Winnipeg.

larry.kusch@freepress.mb.ca

Larry Kush

Larry Kush
Reporter of the legislature

Larry Kush did not know what he wanted to do with his life until he attended a workshop for a high school editor at Regina in the summer of 1969 and listened to the student who spoke about the journalism program at Carleton University in Ottawa.

Read the full biography


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