Monday , May 17 2021

Vacancies remain in the province's HIV program



When the World AIDS Day was first observed on December 1, 1988, it was close to the end of a decade marked by fear, misinformation and prejudice.

Little was understood about a syndrome of acquired immune deficiency, or AIDS, a syndrome caused by a virus called a human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV. People thought it was a disease that struck only homosexuals, ignorance that acted as an accelerator for raging fires of homophobia. Many gay activists of that time remember the visit to funerals for their friends on a weekly basis. Badly understood, too, was how it spread; public awareness campaigns had to convince people that you can not catch it by holding your hands or the toilet. Those sufferings often suffered alone and in silence.

Thirty years later, we understand much more about HIV / AIDS – which has led to progress in prevention, drugs and treatment. Since 2016, some 36.7 million people have been living with HIV globally, with sub-Saharan Africa being the most vulnerable in the region.

But HIV / AIDS is not a problem that exists from the ocean – nor is it a problem that has disappeared, even when it is not at the center of public attention. In Canada, some 63,000 people live with HIV, including 1,318 in Manitoba. And that number is increasing. According to the annual Manitoba health statistics released in January, Manitoba had one of the highest reported rates of diagnosis / incidence of new HIV cases among provinces and territories.

Get the whole story.
No credit card required. Cancel at any time.

Join free for 30 days

After that, pay a bit like $ 0.99 a month for the best local news in Manitoba.

Already a subscriber?

Log In

Join free for 30 days

Already a subscriber?

Log In

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
is not a subscriber? Make an account to start a free trial of 30 days.

Sign in Create your own account

Your free trial is over.

We hope you enjoy the trial! To continue reading, we recommend that you read the members of Read now pay later. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27 ¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national and international news and more, try subscribing to All Access Digital:

Thank you for the support of the journalism we need for our community!

Your free trial is over.

We hope you enjoy the trial! To continue reading, we recommend that you read the members of Read now pay later. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27 ¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national and international news and more, try subscribing to All Access Digital:

Thank you for the support of the journalism we need for our community!

We hope you enjoy the free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Accessible Digital

Introductory prices *

99¢

monthly

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Diary replica e-edition
  • News Break – the award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive tips and discounts

Continue

Read now payments later

Pay

27¢

after an article

  • Without obligations
  • Cancel at any time
  • Pay only for what you are reading
  • Refund available

Continue

* The introductory price schedule for 12 months: $ 0.99 / month plus tax for the first 3 months, $ 5.99 per month for 4-6 months, $ 10.99 per month for 7-9 months, $ 13.99 / month for months 10-12. from $ 16.99 per month starts after the first year.

We hope you enjoy the free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read now payments later

Pay

27¢

after an article

  • Without obligations
  • Cancel at any time
  • Pay only for what you are reading
  • Refund available

Continue

All Accessible Digital

Introductory prices *

99¢

monthly

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Diary replica e-edition
  • News Break – the award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive tips and discounts

Continue

Mon to Delivery

Pay

$34.36

monthly

  • Includes all the benefits of All Access Digital
  • 6-day delivery to our award-winning journal

Continue

* The introductory price schedule for 12 months: $ 0.99 / month plus tax for the first 3 months, $ 5.99 per month for 4-6 months, $ 10.99 per month for 7-9 months, $ 13.99 / month for months 10-12. from $ 16.99 per month starts after the first year.

We hope you enjoy the free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Accessible Digital

Introductory prices *

99¢

monthly

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Diary replica e-edition
  • News Break – the award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive tips and discounts

Continue

Read now payments later

Pay

27¢

after an article

  • Without obligations
  • Cancel at any time
  • Pay only for what you are reading
  • Refund available

Continue

* The introductory price schedule for 12 months: $ 0.99 / month plus tax for the first 3 months, $ 5.99 per month for 4-6 months, $ 10.99 per month for 7-9 months, $ 13.99 / month for months 10-12. from $ 16.99 per month starts after the first year.

We hope you enjoy the free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read now payments later

Pay

27¢

after an article

  • Without obligations
  • Cancel at any time
  • Pay only for what you are reading
  • Refund available

Continue

All Accessible Digital

Introductory prices *

99¢

monthly

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Diary replica e-edition
  • News Break – the award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive tips and discounts

Continue

* The introductory price schedule for 12 months: $ 0.99 / month plus tax for the first 3 months, $ 5.99 per month for 4-6 months, $ 10.99 per month for 7-9 months, $ 13.99 / month for months 10-12. from $ 16.99 per month starts after the first year.

When the World AIDS Day was first observed on December 1, 1988, it was close to the end of a decade marked by fear, misinformation and prejudice.

Little was understood about a syndrome of acquired immune deficiency, or AIDS, a syndrome caused by a virus called a human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV. People thought it was a disease that struck only homosexuals, ignorance that acted as an accelerator for raging fires of homophobia. Many gay activists of that time remember the visit to funerals for their friends on a weekly basis. Badly understood, too, was how it spread; public awareness campaigns had to convince people that you can not catch it by holding your hands or the toilet. Those sufferings often suffered alone and in silence.

The Nine Circle Health Center is one of Winnipeg-based locations that deliver the HIV Program Manitoba. (Supplied)

The Nine Circle Health Center is one of Winnipeg-based locations that deliver the HIV Program Manitoba. (Supplied)

Thirty years later, we understand much more about HIV / AIDS – which has led to progress in prevention, drugs and treatment. Since 2016, some 36.7 million people have been living with HIV globally, with sub-Saharan Africa being the most vulnerable in the region.

But HIV / AIDS is not a problem that exists from the ocean – nor is it a problem that has disappeared, even when it is not at the center of public attention. In Canada, some 63,000 people live with HIV, including 1,318 in Manitoba. And that number is increasing. According to the annual Manitoba health statistics released in January, Manitoba had one of the highest reported rates of diagnosis / incidence of new HIV cases among provinces and territories.

In Winnipeg, the Health Care Center in Nine Circles is one of the two locations based on Winnipeg, along with an outpatient clinic at the Center for Health Sciences, which provides Manitoba for an HIV program that provides information, specialized care, treatment and support for those living with HIV in our province. According to the report on HIV program Manitoba in 2017, in 2017 95 people were involved – 67 percent newly diagnosed with HIV, 66 percent identified as male and 34 percent identified as female.

Of these, 46 percent reported having been infected with HIV through heterosexual sex, 27 percent reported having sex between men and 18 percent by injecting drugs. A disproportionate number of people living in indigenous and African / Caribbean / black people got into care. Stigma and discrimination remain barriers to testing and treatment and still lead to social exclusion.

While the report found that Manitobots are functioning well after being diagnosed and entering the HIV Manitoba HIV program, care problems in this province remain.

A man on Friday in Johannesburg, South Africa, celebrated the World Aids Day. (Denny Farrell / Associated Press)

A man on Friday in Johannesburg, South Africa, celebrated the World Aids Day. (Denny Farrell / Associated Press)

The report recommends routine testing for HIV, which can reduce the stigma associated with testing and help people diagnose themselves early – or at all. One in five Canadians infected with HIV does not know they have it.

The report also recommends free, universal coverage of HIV drugs in Manitoba. Half of those who took care of the HIV Program in Manitoba in 2017 do not have insurance coverage, co-pay to consider or be insurance plans with final terms. And this can be a major problem: delays or interruptions in treatment can lead to poorer health outcomes.

The data can be useful in determining such gaps and, I hope, will result in policy changes. But behind these numbers are real people who live a real life. World AIDS Day and Awareness Week awareness awareness week (December 1-6) is not just about spreading the awareness of the virus or mourning those who are lost from it. It is also for work to create a world in which people living with HIV are not defined by their status. As everyone plays a role in preventing the spread of HIV, we also play a role in preventing the spread of stigma.


Source link