Sunday , May 16 2021

The Soyuz rocket arrives on the ground for the first time after the dramatic failure – Spaceflight Now



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Holding the tradition dating back to the outbreak of the outbreak, the Russian Soyuz rocket left the hangar at the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan before sunrise on Saturday to begin the launch of Sub. 1 in Central Asia, on Monday, with an American-Russian-Canadian team heading for the International Space Station.

The Soyuz-FG rocket journey to the same starting point that was used on Yuri Gagarin's historic first flight in space in 1961 occurred early in the morning, the traditional time for the transfer of Russian rockets from their hangars to their launchers.

But for the first time since 1984, the Soyuz launch has turned a capsule of the crew to return the religious Russian spaceship to a service after a missile failure. In that case, Soyuz returned to the flight after an emergency interruption arose in September 1983, which resulted in the injection of two Soviet cosmonauts into security after their Soyuz rocket fired during the final countdown.

On Saturday, Russian technicians shifted the Soyuz rocket to the background for the first launch of the crew, after a storm failure in October 11 interrupted the journey of Russian commander Alexei Ovchinin and NASA's flying engine, Nick Hague, in orbit in search of the International Space station. Ovchinin and The Hague safely landed several hundred miles from Baikonur, and Russian researchers said they found a failure of a sensor component in the separation system for the four Soyuz rocket amplifiers.

One of the Boosters failed to separate clearly two minutes after the launch, which led the Soyuz computer to order an automatic shutdown. The escape missiles pushed the capsule carried by Ovchinin and The Hague from the rotten rocket, and the crew briefly encountered 6.7 gs while they fell during the fall back on Earth before entering the slopes of the steppe of Kazakhstan .

The Soyuz missiles successfully launched four times since the launch of October 11, recently on November 16, when the Soyuz-FG missile – the same variant used for crew missions – automatically opened the ship to supply travel progress to the space station.

With a four-four-record in the past six weeks, the Soyuz rocket will be held on Monday, with the extension of the train, scheduled at 06:31 EST (1131 GMT, 05:31 AM in Baikonur time).

The announced launch of the crew was shifted from December 20, following a failure to launch in October to ensure that they will begin before the current three-person crew returns to Earth and reduce the time when only three inhabitants in the orbital exploration abroad – is not a normal addition of six.

The team of three people flying on the Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft is led by Oleg Kononenko, a Russian cosmonaut born in Turkmenistan who worked as an engineer and designer in the space program of Russia before choosing a cosmonaut candidate in 1996. Kononenko, 54, flew three expeditions to the space station in 2008, 2011/2012 and 2015, entered 533 days in space.

NASA Astronaut Anna McClane, Russian Commander Oleg Kononenko and Canadian Flying Engineer David Saint-Jacques, are performing in their rocks from Sokol before the spacecraft spacecraft Soyuz MS-11 during the pre-flight check. Credit: NASA / Victor Zelentsov

Cononenko will occupy the center seat of the Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft during launch and dock with the station, to the left of the Canadian space agent cosmonaut David Saint Jacques, who will serve as co-pilot. NASA's astronaut Anna McClane will be the second airline engineer in the right-hand seat of the Soyuz capsule. Both are introduced into the first space missions.

Sen Jacques, 48, is from Saint-Lambert, Quebec, has a degree in engineering physics from École polytechnique de Montréal in Canada. Prof. Dr. in astrophysics at Cambridge University in the United Kingdom and medical education from Laval University in Canada, and helped design adaptive optical and interferometric telescopes and radiological equipment for the hospital in France. Sen Jacques worked as a doctor in a community of euities in Hudson Bay, when he was selected as an astronaut candidate by the Canadian Space Agency in 2009.

McLane is a 39-year-old US Army colonel and a former combat helicopter who served in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Born in Spokane, Washington, Mecklain received a mechanical / aerospace engineering degree from the US Military Academy in West Point, and a Masters in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Bath, and a Masters Degree in International Relations from the University of Bristol, and in England. NASA selected McLane as astronaut candidate in 2013.

Cononenko, Sen Jacques and McClain will take an accelerated, six-hour flight to the space station, culminating in an automatic docking with the Search module at 12:36 pm. EST (1736 GMT) on Monday, when they will join three other crew members, due to the return of the Earth on December 20.

The images below show that the Soyuz rocket appeared on the Baikonur cosmodrome on Saturday.

Credit: NASA / Aubry Gryannis
Credit: NASA / Aubry Gryannis
Credit: Roscosmos
Credit: NASA / Aubry Gryannis
Credit: NASA / Aubry Gryannis
Credit: Roscosmos
Credit: Roscosmos
Credit: NASA / Aubry Gryannis
Credit: Roscosmos
Credit: Roscosmos
Credit: Roscosmos
Credit: NASA / Aubry Gryannis
Credit: Roscosmos
Credit: Roscosmos
Credit: Roscosmos
Credit: Roscosmos
Credit: Roscosmos
Credit: NASA / Aubry Gryannis
Credit: Roscosmos
Credit: Roscosmos

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Follow Steven Clark on Twitter: @ StephenClark1.


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