Friday , May 14 2021

Stanford scientists use virtual reality to help save the real world




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The Stanford Oxidation of the Oceanic Virtual Reality Experience (VR)Stanford Virtual Laboratory for Human Interaction

Climate behavior as a "2C threshold" and "ocean acidity" barely confuse emotions. But the consequences of these phenomena can easily be overcome: One hundred million people planned to lose their lives in the coming 11 years due to climate change. About 75% of all people could die because of this deadly heat waves by 2100. Stanford researchers dive into Virtual Reality (VR) as a powerful tool for abstract climate threats for both visual and personal before climate change effects become life-threatening, visceral, and personal. A document from today in the magazine Limits in psychology shows how VR is a technological blow at the center of empathy that encourages us to act before it's too late.

Learning

The researchers used VR consuming grade equipment and a simulation simulation of Stanford oceanic acid (SOAE) simulation in 4 different experiments. The participants were attended by 270 high school students, undergraduate and postgraduate students and adults at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2016.

SOAE reflects the effects of climate change on our marine ecosystems. The simulation is available to the public for download free. You can choose between being an avatar of a diver or being part of the pink coral that lives your best life on the underwater ridge. That is, while you and all your vivid underwater friends do not begin to die. The simulation time reduces the underwater Holocaust to a striking interval. In one version, the storyline of the storyteller takes you:

Look at the right hand. Notice how acidity corrodes a shell of sea snails. Take a moment to go around and look for sea snails in this area. I can not find? This is because there are no live sea snails here. They can not survive in this environment. Oxidation of the ocean will seriously affect all shellfish species, including oysters, shells, corals and certain plankton species. Without these types, the whole food network may collapse. "

Watch clips from the study and SOAE:

The results

Participants test ocean acidity results after the simulation increased by more than 100%. Ocean acidity information has been tested, and retention has shown more than three weeks later. The more time the participants spent engaging in the simulation, the more information they retained. & Nbsp;

Postdoctoral researcher Geraldine Faville says the team is working on the "act now" element of the simulation, researching "specific actions that individuals can think and apply in their everyday lives." In marketing science, this is the most critical step in selling your message. Climate scientists and VR engineers could potentially benefit from recruiting Don Draper for marketing science to convince humankind to click on the "Act Now!" Button. & Nbsp;

Unexpected discovery

"In the history of the VR, we talked a lot about how to use it for education," said Jeremy Baylenson, a cognitive psychologist, director of the virtual interaction laboratory at Stanford University and co-author of the newspaper. He says the study shows "you can successfully install VR in the curriculum, people enjoy it. They study." "There are no negative consequences." This finding was expected. What was interesting and unexpected is why VR seems to increase knowledge and empathy. "In two of the four studies in this paper, we can predict how many people care about the environment and how much they want to learn about the environment on the basis of how they move their body in the simulation." In VR studies this is called "embodied knowledge" and Bailenson thinks this is the mechanism that causes the message to resonate. "The movement of your body is the secret sauce here and what makes VR special," says Bailenson, also pointing out that the findings are correlative, not necessarily causative.

From a paper from Stanford: "Participants who explored more than the virtual space created deeper cognitive associations with the content of science."

Today's study comes after the signing of an unrelated effort published by the Nobel Laureate and his team at the Max Planck Institute in Germany last month that thinking is using the brain navigation system and that knowledge is organized spatially.

Impact

Participants reported a universally positive VR experience. "It's pretty cool, pretty responsive," says 18-year-old Cameron Chapman. "I definitely felt like I was under water."

"It was much more realistic than I expected," says high school student Alexa Levison. "I'm a visual student. Watching the acidity of the oceans is different from listening to it."

A similar enthusiasm was observed at the Tribeca Film Festival:

Jane Rosenthal runs this event where the BF is the festival's wing and has dozens of cabins where you can enter and perform VR, "says & nbsp;Bailenson. "The festival lasts for about a week. It's open from late in the morning to the evening. We had an adult line that sometimes was 100 people at a time. They wait one hour, sometimes two hours, to learn basically about chemistry. "

The team was demonstrated by SOAE for Senator Sheldon Wyhough from Rhode Island, Congressman Susan Bonamichi of Oregon and former Senator Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas. "This simulation shows with rich details of the damage that pollutes carbon pollution in our oceans," Whitehouse said after the event at Capitol Hill, organized by the non-profit environmental advocacy group Ocean Conservancy. "I appreciate the Stanford oceanic experience of acidification to draw attention to the dangers that our oceans face and what we need to do to protect them."

VR does not change the firm commitment to denying the climate:

"I was lucky enough to come to the laboratory of an American congressman and actually do my oxygen oxidation experience," says Bailenson, a congressman who is the messenger of negative climate change. "He served in our army in incredible ways. He came to the laboratory and was highly respected. He made twenty demonstrations where he really made them. He not only went through the proposals. "The Congressman was cooperative and engaged, but when Bilesonson asked for feedback on BP's climate education, the answer he received was as depressing as a corroded marine snail:

Let me get this right, "thought Bailenson." I paraphrase. I did not record it, so I do not have a direct offer. The general idea of ​​what he said was, you think you are presenting me with science. What I see as you present is what we call it democratic science. It is the capital of democracy. So, you choose a kind of science that resonates with the Democrats, but this is not universal. In fact, I did not hear that term before. Since then I've heard it, because I obviously looked at it. It was like a discouraging moment that I had during work. The experience of acquiring the Stanford Ocean has been intensively checked by numerous scientists, our brilliant counterparts, [marine scientists] Christie Croaker and Fio Michele. All this is based on their work, where every detail ranges from how many centimeters this snail is now from this kind of coral, all those details, "said Bailenson." We are investing a lot of time and effort into and only the idea that polarization is enough high that marine science was reduced as a Democratic, it was not a high point. "

The Congressman advised Bailenson about what he could do differently to convince people about climate change and its effects.

He was careful not to get familiar with the scientific details of climate change models. Because I do not think it would be playing the stuff he was comfortable talking to. He talked about the problem of political discussions about climate change is that it always affects its constituents. In his area, fracking is very large and natural gas is very large. He encouraged me if I should try to make VR messages for the preservation of the environment, to clearly show how it does not compare economic goals. "

The other suggestion was the one that Bailenson had previously heard – looking at the conversation about how climate change influences changes in patterns of migration and how it affects things like the hunting season. "It was a whole conversation where a man who had an incredible record serving our country, a very prominent lawmaker, who at the end of the day really tried it, just rejected what we built as a democratic science."

Using VR, Bailenson managed to educate representatives of Palau on negative environmental impacts. You can read about his works that affect lawmakers for conservation in an article that Bayson writes National Geographic.

Learn more about VR experiments, education and environmental protection in Bailenson's Virtual Laboratory for Human Interaction at Stanford University.

* Funding for this research was provided by the Gordon Foundation and Betty Moore Foundation.

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The Stanford Oxidation of the Oceanic Virtual Reality Experience (VR)Stanford Virtual Laboratory for Human Interaction

Climate behavior as a "2C threshold" and "ocean acidity" barely confuse emotions. But the consequences of these phenomena can easily be overcome: One hundred million people planned to lose their lives in the coming 11 years due to climate change. About 75% of all people could die because of this deadly heat waves by 2100. Stanford researchers dive into Virtual Reality (VR) as a powerful tool for abstract climate threats for both visual and personal before climate change effects become life-threatening, visceral, and personal. A document from today in the magazine Limits in psychology shows how VR is a technological blow at the center of empathy that encourages us to act before it's too late.

Learning

The researchers used VR consuming grade equipment and a simulation simulation of Stanford oceanic acid (SOAE) simulation in 4 different experiments. The participants were attended by 270 high school students, undergraduate and postgraduate students and adults at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2016.

SOAE reflects the effects of climate change on our marine ecosystems. The simulation is available to the public for download free. You can choose between being an avatar of a diver or being part of the pink coral that lives your best life on the underwater ridge. That is, while you and all your vivid underwater friends do not begin to die. The simulation time reduces the underwater Holocaust to a striking interval. In one version, the storyline of the storyteller takes you:

Look at the right hand. Notice how acidity corrodes a shell of sea snails. Take a moment to go around and look for sea snails in this area. I can not find? This is because there are no live sea snails here. They can not survive in this environment. Oxidation of the ocean will seriously affect all shellfish species, including oysters, shells, corals and certain plankton species. Without these types, the whole food network may collapse. "

Watch clips from the study and SOAE:

The results

Participants test ocean acidity results after the simulation increased by more than 100%. Ocean acidity information has been tested, and retention has shown more than three weeks later. The more time the participants spent engaging in the simulation, the more information they retained.

Postdoctoral researcher Geraldine Faville says the team is working on the "act now" element of the simulation, researching "the specific actions that individuals can think and apply in their everyday lives." In marketing science, this is the most critical step in selling your message. Climate scientists and VR engineers can potentially benefit from recruiting Don Draper for marketing science to persuade humankind to click on the "Act Now!" Button.

Unexpected discovery

"In the history of the VR, we talked a lot about how to use it for education," said Jeremy Baylenson, a cognitive psychologist, director of the virtual interaction laboratory at Stanford University and co-author of the newspaper. He says the study shows "you can successfully install VR in the curriculum, people enjoy it. They study." "There are no negative consequences." This finding was expected. What was interesting and unexpected is why VR seems to increase knowledge and empathy. "In two of the four studies in this paper, we can predict how many people care about the environment and how much they want to learn about the environment on the basis of how they move their body in the simulation." In VR studies this is called "embodied knowledge" and Bailenson thinks this is the mechanism that causes the message to resonate. "The movement of your body is the secret sauce here and what makes VR special," says Bailenson, also pointing out that the findings are correlative, not necessarily causative.

From a paper from Stanford: "Participants who explored more than the virtual space created deeper cognitive associations with the content of science."

Today's study comes after the signing of an unrelated effort published by the Nobel Laureate and his team at the Max Planck Institute in Germany last month that thinking is using the brain navigation system and that knowledge is organized spatially.

Impact

Participants reported a universally positive VR experience. "It's pretty cool, pretty responsive," says 18-year-old Cameron Chapman. "I definitely felt like I was under water."

"It was much more realistic than I expected," says high school student Alexa Levison. "I'm a visual student. Watching the acidity of the oceans is different from listening to it."

A similar enthusiasm was observed at the Tribeca Film Festival:

Jane Rosenthal runs this event where the BF is the festival's wing and has dozens of cabins where you can go and perform VR, says Bailenson. "The festival lasts for about a week. It's open from late in the morning to the evening. We had an adult line that sometimes was 100 people at a time. They wait one hour, sometimes two hours, to learn basically about chemistry. "

The team was demonstrated by SOAE for Senator Sheldon Wyhough from Rhode Island, Congressman Susan Bonamichi of Oregon and former Senator Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas. "This simulation shows with rich details of the damage that pollutes carbon pollution in our oceans," Whitehouse said after the event at Capitol Hill, organized by the non-profit environmental advocacy group Ocean Conservancy. "I appreciate the Stanford oceanic experience of acidification to draw attention to the dangers that our oceans face and what we need to do to protect them."

VR does not change the firm commitment to denying the climate:

"I was lucky enough to come to the laboratory of an American congressman and actually do my oxygen oxidation experience," says Bailenson, a congressman who is the messenger of negative climate change. "He served in our army in incredible ways. He came to the laboratory and was highly respected. He made twenty demonstrations where he really made them. He not only went through the proposals. "The Congressman was cooperative and engaged, but when Bilesonson asked for feedback on BP's climate education, the answer he received was as depressing as a corroded marine snail:

Let me get this right, "thought Bailenson." I paraphrase. I did not record it, so I do not have a direct offer. The general idea of ​​what he said was, you think you are presenting me with science. What I see as you present is what we call it democratic science. It is the capital of democracy. So, you choose a kind of science that resonates with the Democrats, but this is not universal. In fact, I did not hear that term before. Since then I've heard it, because I obviously looked at it. It was like a discouraging moment that I had during work. The experience of acquiring the Stanford Ocean has been intensively checked by numerous scientists, our brilliant counterparts, [marine scientists] Christie Croaker and Fio Michele. Сето ова е засновано на нивната работа, каде што секој детал се движи од тоа колку сантиметри е овој полжав сега од овој вид корали, сите тие детали ", рече Бејленсон. "Ние вложуваме многу време и напори во и само идејата дека поларизацијата е доволно висока што морската наука е намалена како Демократска, тоа не беше висока точка".

Конгресменот го советуваше Бејленсон за тоа што може да направи поинаку за да ги убеди луѓето за климатските промени и за нејзините ефекти.

Беше внимателен да не ги запознае научните детали за моделите на климатските промени. Затоа што јас не мислам дека тоа би било играње на работи тој беше удобно да се зборува. Тој зборуваше за проблемот со политичките дискусии за климатските промени е тоа што секогаш влијае на неговите составни делови. Во неговата област, fracking е многу голем и природниот гас е многу голем. Тој ме поттикнуваше дали треба да се обидам да направам VR пораки за зачувување на животната средина, за да јасно покажеме како не ги споредува економските цели ".

Другата сугестија беше онаа што Бејленсон претходно ја слушнала – разгледувајќи го разговорот во однос на тоа како климатските промени влијаат на промените во моделите на миграција и како тоа влијае на нештата како сезоната на лов. "Целокупно беше разговор каде што еден човек кој имаше неверојатен рекорд служејќи нашата земја, кој беше многу истакнат пратеник, кој на крајот од денот навистина го пробуваше, само го отфрли она што го изградивме како демократска наука".

Користејќи VR, Bailenson успеа да ги едуцира претставниците на островот Палау за негативните влијанија врз животната средина. Можете да прочитате за неговите дела кои влијаат на законодавците кон конзервација во една статија за која Бијлсон пишува National Geographic.

Дознајте повеќе за VR експериментите, образованието и заштитата на животната средина во Bailenson&#39;s Виртуелна лабораторија за човечка интеракција на Универзитетот Стенфорд.

* Финансирањето за ова истражување беше обезбедено од Фондацијата Гордон и Бети Мур.


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