Saturday , July 31 2021

Pot- $ 1 gas – more drop – Penticton news



UPDATE: 2:15 pm

More gas stations cut their prices in South Okanagan.

The Kanco station on the Penticton government's government reduced the price of the pump to 99.9 cents per liter, while "Super rescue on the green mountain" is currently 98.9, according to GasBuddy.com.

Kelowna stations are stable at 119.9, while in Vernon it is 118.9 in most locations.


ORIGINAL: 8:20 AM

Is a mini gas war to erupt?

GasBuddy.com announces prices up to 99 cents per liter in Penticton.

It's in Petrochan on Westminster Avenue. Most other stations in the city are at 104.9, with some ranging up to 110.9.

It's even cheaper than Kelowna, where current prices remain 119.9 to 121.9 cents per liter of regular emissions.

Meanwhile, in Vernon, gas stations often report prices of 119.9, but range from 118.9 to 122.9.

If you see others after running the prices below $ 1, tell us and send a photo [email protected].

135724

Castanet Penticton counts the top stories of 2018.

We will count this year's number 1 on December 31 and we will publish a New Year's journalist.

While complaints about drug use and roaming in the center of Penticton are not completely new, the situation has outgrown in 2018 and civil society discourses dominated the whole year.

In February, the city council received an infarction from the Penticton Center chairman Ryan Graham, who said neighborhood businesses were "besieged" by petty criminals and drug users.

"They have daily drug users who come in and use their dishwasher as injection sites," he told the council. "This is a battle that we all lose."

It seems that the council and city staff have agreed, under the leadership of City Manager Peter Weber, the municipality has spent more than $ 320,000 on the problem. The bright lights flooded the lights now illuminate Nanaimo Square, benches are removed along Penticton Creek, fences mounted on curbs to prevent people from resting.

Additional subordinate officers were engaged during the summer, containers for removal of a needle were placed and patrols were carried out.

Filled in was Paul Braun, a well-known panhandler of a block of 200 on the main street, who refused to move from his regular place before the breeze.

The city has piled up bins and ashtrays where it usually sat, but did not deter Brown.

Panhandeur eventually accepted a plea agreement on what was supposed to be open for his trial.

"The only reason I agreed with all of this is to feel that I'm supported at an angle," Brown said. "If I go to jail, I will go out and be homeless again and the whole cycle will start again."

Public security has become the single biggest issue in municipal elections, with incumbent Mayor Andrew Jacobuett, challenger Jason Cox and eventual winner John Vasilaki, who advocated rhetoric about the perceived sad state of the streets of Penticton.

This year, however, the provincial government appeared on the table in a great way.

Housing began with the construction of three subsidized events, one of which was allocated to those on the street. The former Super 8 Motel will also be open and will work as a home for the homeless in 2019.

The year ended with the new mayor John Vasilaki, who attacked the police's management with the central core and publicly called for patrols in the city center.

"I can assure you, sir, people are frightened in the downtown area and the surrounding township," Vasilaki told De Jaeger during a council meeting in December.

Police meanwhile said patrols on their feet would take more serious fighting against crime – which means the issue will remain important for Penticton residents in 2019.

After a year that saw security in the center and touch dominated the public discourse, the head of South Okanagan RCMP is an optimistic seed planted earlier this year, will bring forth fruit in 2019.

This year, two major initiatives have been launched by local RCMPs; Community Active Support Table (CAST) and Community Support and Implementation Team.

When connected with more than 200 units of subsidized apartments that come online in 2019, Supt. Ted de Jaeger expects to see positive changes.

"It will be a good year, I am very confident that it will help. But with the same sign, let's not be naive – we will not eliminate homelessness and we will not eliminate dependencies."

"As a police agency we are working on facts and evidence, and the facts and evidence of communities that have brought housing is that it has a significant impact on those social issues," he added.

CAST delivers social service providers, non-profit organizations and government agencies once a week to formulate individual solutions for the most ugly city, which may be homeless or young. De Jaeger said the mass was about 25 cases since it began in August.

The community support and law enforcement team is on the ground a little longer, active since January. Team led by KPL. Lori Rock has a mental health officer and other members who can be deployed in sensitive situations.

In 2019, the team will receive a youth officer, who will most likely be deeply engaged with the youth center on the main street in an effort to link young people at risk.

"We try to hire a young youth officer at risk, but also to be there as a resource and trusted person for community youth to talk and communicate," De Jager said.

He said the police department is also making efforts in 2019 to improve the security perceptions of Penticton city center, pointing out that the Center for Social Policy is not a provider of social services.

"We are focused on crime, it's our term. Homelessness and addiction, they are not crimes, these are social issues."

Indeed, the role of the police in combating these social issues is the introduction of the streets to support, instead of writing a ticket "I would rather quit or behave towards addiction rather than send someone in jail just to get out and to continue to do so. "

"The city center is a really safe place to compare with other centers in the city center, but it's a little comfort for someone who has a problem with someone."

"We really want to change that perception. I am very lively for the fact that there are social problems and some of those people look scary, but we need to change into a narrative and solve this issue so that we can continue with what we are doing the best; the fight against crime ".

Looking south to Oliver, who has suffered two murders in the region this year, De Jager said his priority is to get the separation to full staffing.

The community saw a public forum held for crime before the municipal elections, where residents resented what they say is a degrading situation.

De Jaeger in Oliver says that, like most communities, it is the core "group of prolific offenders who make the vast majority of work." He said the squad was working to direct those who carried out most of the crime in a small town.

In Summerland, a new sergeant is hired and will soon be released. Blocked viewing programs will also be used throughout the region in 2019, he said.

Penticton will also host another forum for community policing in March 2019.

135724

UPDATE: 10 am.

The priest at Penticton Sikh Temple reportedly left the temple and the lawsuit against him was rejected, according to a member of the assembly on Sunday.

The Penticton Sikh Temple and the Indian Cultural Society filed a civil complaint against the employee, saying that while the man was fired, he refused to leave his residence at the temple.

One of the members of the assembly stated that the lawsuit against the former priest was rejected.

"The whole society was informed by the members of the Executive Committee," he said.


ORIGINAL: 5 am.

The Penticton Sikh Temple and the Indian Cultural Society filed a civil complaint against the employee, saying that although he was fired, he refused to leave his residence at the temple.

The civil claim, lodged at the Kelowna Supreme Court on 28 December, named Yasser Singh as a defendant, describing him as "a pastor who was previously employed in [Penticton Sikh Temple and Indian Cultural Society]. "

According to the claim, Singh was first employed as an employee in the contract in 2015, but was upgraded to a full-time employment in 2016. As part of his position, he received a small bedroom to live in the temple and using communal cuisine, although he was not supposed to use them.

His responsibilities include leading services at the temple at dawn and dusk, and acting as a spiritual leader and adviser to the approximately 640-member assembly.

Additional duties include Divanas on Sundays, which are prayer meetings that last from about 9 am to 2 pm, as well as carrying out ceremonies of birth, baptisms, weddings, funerals and the like.

In July 2018, claims the claim, the Association began to have problems in meeting these obligations to Singh. In November, he was given a disciplinary letter, which they claimed to have had no effect. Then, in December, a member of the assembly, reportedly, Singh "started a tirade against him, which included vulgarity and threat."

On December 17, Singh was fired, and was immediately notified. However, the civil claim claims that Singh refused to leave the temple and continues to insist on performing his everyday tasks.

The claim is a request for temporary and permanent orders that Singh left the temple and removed his belongings, ceased to interfere with the work of the Society, and provided expenses to compensate legal proceedings if he decided to oppose the lawsuit.

The company's lawyer, Alfred Campf, gave his argument on the legal basis in the claim, saying Singh "is overstepping" in this case because the accommodation was secured on the basis of employment and adding that in this case, since Singh did not have his own premises, only a sleeping room .

Castanet failed to reach Jasbir Singh for comment at this moment.

None of the above allegations has been proven in court.

Chelsea Powrie

Kritteraid Animal Sanctuary is looking for help to renovate their "retirement room," a place where all cats that are not appropriated who call shelter at home can live out their days in comfort and safety.

The sanctuary always seeks to find homes for their wards, but some are too old or require specialized care and should be permanent residents. That's why Environmental Director Jesse Bayer hopes some generous volunteers will retreat to help fund or perform much-needed renovations in the back room that cats will call.

"Winter is a great time to be done in a little facelifts," Bayer said. "So, we would like to bring it back to the towers, to set up new raw materials, new colors. We would really like to find a new, better, more economical window and absolutely need to be updated on our floor."

Beer said the past projects included a new room for the adoption of the shrine, which was named Amy's adoption room in honor of the cat adopted by the family, donating funds for its renovation and front lobby, through sponsors and donors.

She said the project for a small retirement room would be ideal for the family or group that will run as an ongoing volunteer project.

"We hope that the elders of our sanctuary can have a warm show room in which many of our kittens can come and give them the care of the end of life we ​​really are trying to give," Bayer said.

To find out more about what the retirement project needs in need of donations, materials and work hours, contact Beer directly at 250-488-3226 or send Critteraid here and send the project.

Penticton's firearm chief Larry Watkinson said floods and fires dominated much of the year for his team, and while proud of the many achievements they made, some projects, unfortunately, had to be pushed.

"Having two back and forth kind of catastrophic years of interface fires and a major flood threat to the community puts us in a position to have to catch up to work so that some of the goals we set forward do not have to get achieved we still we did a lot, "Watkinson said.

Achievements included the organization of the first local wildfire training symposium in April, in which over 100 firefighters from 27 different municipalities learned techniques in the country and in the air to combat forest fires.

"When it happened in 2017, we realized there were some gaps in the provincial demands for firefighters to respond to other communities and how to work, so we wanted to focus some processes and actually made some practical training on the ground," Watkinson said.

The event was such a success, they will be repeated this spring, and Watkinson has already received requests to hold seats for those who want to attend.

Another change this year was the increased community communication program, with prevention staff spending more time in places such as schools and retirees communities that share tips on how to burn from home at home with cooking, candles, fire alarms, smoke detectors and the like.

"People have a better idea of ​​the security programs available to us as part of our department, which is great," Watkinson said.

The department also held its first youth academy for fire protection, in which eight high school students spent 100 hours on official training in the spring.

"We are proud to say that some of those children who actually graduated from that program are now going through the process to become assistant firefighters with us. We are very happy to see that they are progressing with their interest in our profession, and seriously," Watkinson .

Auxiliary firefighters are particularly important now, as many of the older members of the department are retirement age. Some have retired this year, Watkinson said, creating space for new faces.

"We fill them with excellent, very capable auxiliary members of our department, which is wonderful to see," he said.

Watkinson also stressed his deputy head Chris Forster for his hard work this year, providing grants for their emergency management program. Forster provided nearly $ 1 million in grants that helped mitigate floods and emergency support teams.

Looking ahead, Watkinson is eager to start with some of the projects he put on the rear burner with all the emergency.

"Most often, what we are trying to do is risk analysis for our community, because it concerns threats from fires in the community. That's why we have a program for dangerous materials that will start in the spring," Watkinson said. "Identifying what dangerous materials are in our community, do we have the appropriate resources to mitigate those dangers, and what to do if we do not have access to it."

Plus, the fire department will continue the community information programs and if another season of floods or fires arrives, they now have a comprehensive plan to cope with the disaster.

Chelsea Powrie

Castanet Penticton counts the top stories of 2018.

We will count this year's number 1 on December 31 and we will publish a New Year's journalist.

It was the worst fiery season of the record. 2,090 forest fires and more than 1.3 million hectares burned in BC during 2018, and South Okanagan struggled with some of the biggest fires.

A lightning storm in mid-July caused one-third of one-night fires in South Okanagan, including the highly visible fire of the Kokle Mountain, which set fire to Summerland, and the Snowy Mountain Fire, which at one point was the largest burning in the northeast. AD and reached the peak of up to 18,000 hectares in size.

Evacuation alarms were in force for about 500 properties in Cawston and Keremeos in August, and the blaze demanded several structures of the Lower Symbolic Indian Band Land.

Fire "Snow Mountain" was visible on Mount K. and in combination with the nearby mountain fire Plaser, filled South Okanagan with smoke in most of August and threw pieces of ash from ash and the remains of burning trees around the area.

The rains in late August began to help firefighters, but BC. WildFire did not leave its Keremos camp until September 18.

Повеќето денови во август имало најмалку пет "пожари на белешка" кои се наведени на веб-страницата на пожарниот центар Kamloops, што значи пожари кои претставуваат закана за јавната безбедност.

Вкупно 428 пожари запалиле 54.351 хектари во пожарниот центар Камлупс, а пред сè, трошоците за сузбивање на пожарите на Б.Ц. се околу 468 милиони долари за годината.

Повеќе Penticton Вести


Source link