Saturday , July 31 2021

I asked for speeds for stretching Vilks says a new city councilor



Drivers may have to relieve the accelerator on a short section of the Wilks Avenue, if the residents of the area and his new adviser will return to the road.

Coun. Kevin Klein (CharlesWood-Texed) announced on Thursday that she would submit a proposal to the Assiniboia community committee next week, urging the city administration to conduct a traffic study on Wilks Avenue from Shaftesbury Boulevard to the Perimeter Highway.

The rookie advisor said he hoped the city of Winnipeg would reduce the speed limit of the section on the Wilks Avenue from Loudoun Road to Liberty Street to 50 km / h (80 km / h). Klein said during a civil election last fall, he talked with many people in the department, who thought the speed of Wilks should be reduced.

"It was one of the questions I heard from everyone as a roadblock and really a security concern," he said.

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Drivers may have to relieve the accelerator on a short section of the Wilks Avenue, if the residents of the area and his new adviser will return to the road.

Coun. Kevin Klein (CharlesWood-Texed) announced on Thursday that she would submit a proposal to the Assiniboia community committee next week, urging the city administration to conduct a traffic study on Wilks Avenue from Shaftesbury Boulevard to the Perimeter Highway.



<img src = "https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/400*600/NEP5270604.jpg" alt = "

Cars are dropping Wilks Ave. with posted speed limit.

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RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Cars are dropping Wilks Ave. with posted speed limit.

The rookie advisor said he hoped the city of Winnipeg would reduce the speed limit of the section on the Wilks Avenue from Loudoun Road to Liberty Street to 50 km / h (80 km / h). Klein said during a civil election last fall, he talked with many people in the department, who thought the speed of Wilks should be reduced.

"It was one of the questions I heard from everyone as a roadblock and really a security concern," he said.

"When everyone in Charlewood and Texeda tells me that they are afraid to drive to Wilks, or receive an email with the subject line, saying that almost someone has been killed, something has to be done … There were a number of close misses, but luck no one lost his life, as far as I know. "

Resident resident Carl Roberts was one of those who complained to Klein about limiting the speed of that part of the Vilks Avenue during the municipal elections. Since then he has joined the Charles Hall Advisory Group set up by Klein, following his election to the Council.

"Something needs to be done to slow people down in the area, because every week there are accidents at Elmhurst (Paul) and Wilkes, a matter of time before there is fatality," said Roberts.

He said he believed the problems arise from the complications of the plans to build a route to Sterling Lyon Parkway, and the city should find a way to address them in the long run. In the meantime, Roberts said the speed reduction would improve the situation.

While Alley Wilks from the Shaftesbury Boulevard to the Perimeter Highway is a provincial road (No. 145), Klein said he believes the city should do its in-depth analysis by putting into operation a study.

Wilks Avenue is not immune to fatal accidents. In October 2005, Brian Fraser, 45, died after his vehicle collided with a gravel truck between Charles W. and Perimeter. Sandi, his wife for more than 24 years, survived the crash.

A medical supervisor with the Winnipeg Fire Paramedics Service said at that time there were emergency workers 20 minutes to get the first victim out of the van using the Jaws of Life.

"It was a significant impact and the impact was on the driver's door," said Paul Roberts. "It's 90 kilometers per hour in that area, so it's a significant speed."

While his main concern at Vilks Avenue is the tape between Louvain Street and Liberty Street, Klein said there are other issues he hopes to consider the proposed study. Increased traffic has been spurred by the recent development of the IKEA store and exit center on Kenston Boulevard and Sterling Lyon Parkway (which becomes Wilks in Shaftesbury).

"Since Wilks has no end strips, so when there is a train, traffic can be returned and people are trying to go," he said, noting that the ultimate solution could wipe Wilks to the perimeter.

"We have to do it step by step. To do the speed limit first, then the next step should be the inclusion of the province."

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Kevin Rolandon

Kevin Rolandon
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Kevin Rolandon is one of the most diverse journalists at Winnipeg Free Press.

Regardless of whether it covers the city hall, courtrooms or general reporting, Rolandon can be considered not only to respond to 5 Ws – Who, what, when, where and why – but to do it in an interesting and accessible way for readers .

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