Wednesday , April 21 2021

Flood, damp and fear of high water: what they look like in Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick in the flood



Residents of Central and Eastern Canada found themselves on canoeing in the streets of major cities over floods that flooded communities in three provinces.

Communities in Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick are tackling the rising levels of water that forced authorities to buy sandbags and homeowners to transfer their properties to higher places to avoid being damaged by floods.

Here is the situation in all three provinces:

Ontario

Southwest Ontario is set to face a low-pressure system in Texas, which is expected to bring rainfall of 20 to 45 millimeters from Thursday evening to Friday.

Rain, ranging from 20 to 35 millimeters, is expected to hit south-central and southern northeastern Ontario, and southeast Ontario can be seen from 20 to 30 millimeters.

Flood alerts have been issued in a number of areas, including the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF), Bancroft, Kempville, North Bay, Money Sound, Pembroke and Salt St. Marie.

WATCH: Istanbul declared a state of emergency in Ottawa, it is already envisaged to raise the peak of 2017, and more rain in the forecast next week could exacerbate the crisis. Abigail Bimman reports.






READ MORE: The city of Ottawa declares a state of emergency as it is projected that the level of flooding will rise above the peak of 2017

Warnings have also been issued in the protection authorities of Crow Valley, the Kawarte region, the Lower Trent Valley, the Mississippi Valley, the northern gulf of Matawwa and Ottobay, as well as the Quintet valley, the River and the South Nation River – the latter includes the Otawa River.

Only from the Otava River basin experienced "significant rains" of April 18, which exposed "all areas subject to floods" from Lac Koulong to the Montreal Archipelago.

Peak levels of the Ottawa River could be similar to those recorded two years ago.

WATCH: The Minden flood may reach historic levels in 2013





WATCH: April 21 – Riparian risk in Peterborough and the Quartet region





Some residents of Bracebridge are advised to evacuate their homes after a state of emergency had been declared over Tuesday's floods.

Karin Lieberman / Global News

Emergency state of Middlen Hills is declared a state of emergency.

Mark Junta / Global Peterborough

Floods to visit Minden Hills.

Global News

Increasing the level of water from the flood of the Anson Street in the Gal River, on Thursday in Minden, Ontan.

Mark Junta / Global Peterborough

Flooding along the river Gal in Minden on April 24, 2019.

Mark Junta / Global Peterborough

Quebec

Some of the most serious floods in Quebec are expected to hit the Rigou area, which could see records reaching 100 years before water withdrawals.

But this does not just affect the size of the floods that affected other parts of the province.

The Ste-Marie community in the Chaudiere-Appalaches region noted that more residences were flooded by anyone else, with affected 500 residences.

READ MORE: How Can Canada Cushion the Impact of Floods? Experts say better urban planning

Then follows St-André d'Argenteuil in the Laurentides region, where 169 homes were redeemed, and Gatino, where 133 residences were flooded.

Everyone is talking, there are over 2,500 residences that have been flooded across Quebec.

See: Riud predicts a historical flood level





WATCH: Île-Perrot under pressure as floods continues





Workers install a temporary dam to keep the floods on Thursday, April 25, 2019, in Laval, Que.

CANADIAN PRESS / Ryan Remiorz

A man drowned in the water on a flooded street to reach the house on Saturday April 20, 2019 in Ste-Marie Que.

CANADIAN PRESS / Jacques Boisin

Canadian forces went through the floods on Thursday, April 25, 2019 in Laval, Que.

CANADIAN PRESS / Ryan Remiorz

Workers have built a sandbag around a house in a flooded settlement in Ile Biszard, Que., On Wednesday, April 24, 2019.

CANADIAN PRESS / Paul Khasson

Police patrolled the flooded settlement of Ile Biszard, Que., On Wednesday, April 24, 2019.

CANADIAN PRESS / Paul Khasson

Police Montreal police officers patrolled a crowded settlement on Ile Bisard, Que., On Wednesday, April 24, 2019.

CANADIAN PRESS / Paul Khasson

Mike Laurent (front) and Mario Vizina are preparing to climb the canoe through the floods, Wednesday, April 24, 2019, in Gatino, Que.

CANADIAN PRESS / Adrian Wild

New Brunswick

Several communities face floods in New Brunswick, but much of them are concentrated in the southern parts of the province.

The provincial government advised residents in communities such as Quispamsis / Saint John, Oak Point, Grand Lake, Jemseg, Maugerville and Sheffield / Lakeville Corner to "take all necessary precautions," which includes protecting homes and relocating objects to a higher level .

The provincial capital of Fredericton also sees water levels that are expected to change in the coming days, but are not expected to be withdrawn by the end of this week.

WATCH: The Great Lake, N.B. residents powerless while watching the floods overcame homes and cottages





WATCH: The high waters of St. John River flood the city of Fredericton





Flooded water from the St. John River rises above the wall that floods the Fredericton Street on Sunday, April 21, 2019.

CANADIAN PRESS / Stephen McGilly

The children see the flood of the St. John River in Fredericton on Sunday, April 21, 2019.

CANADIAN PRESS / Stephen McGilly

The city building along the St. John River is surrounded by floods in Fredericton on Sunday, April 21, 2019.

CANADIAN PRESS / Stephen McGilly

Mark Palmer went through the flood waters of the St. John River after he bound his brother's ship on the pillar behind him so as not to drift until the water continues to grow in St. John, NB on Wednesday, April 24, 2019.

CANADIAN PRESS / Stephen McGilly

A woman went through the flood waters of the St. John River on the only access road to the Dominion Park Park in St. John, NB, on Wednesday, April 24, 2019.

CANADIAN PRESS / Stephen McGilly

On Wednesday, April 24, 2019, the vehicle drives across the flood waters of the St. John River on the only access road to the Dominion Park community in St. John, N. B.

CANADIAN PRESS / Stephen McGilly

Stephen Howrell shoots his daughter Katherine, 5, next to the high markers for the St. John's River in Fredericton on Sunday, April 21, 2019.

CANADIAN PRESS / Stephen McGilly

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.


Source link