Saturday , April 17 2021

Cruise ships are so big, say the BCC industries. should act now to restore infrastructure – BC



The arrival of another huge cruise ship at the Vancouver port approached calls to restore BCC's coastal infrastructure.

333 meters Norway's joy sailing under the Lions Gate bridge on Thursday night, with barely enough space to squeeze through a small tide and had to wait for the water to be lowered again to sail on the Alaska Fridays.

Only five meters of space was left between the top of the ship and the bottom of the bridge, as it passed slowly under it.

WATCH: Inside the huge Norwegian cruise ship





With 18 decks, a track for movement, a virtual reality, dozens of bars and restaurants and a space for 4,000 passengers, the Norwegian Cruise Lines says Joy represents the future of cruise ships.

"The beauty of the size of the boat is that we can put so many things that give our guests a choice," said Andy Stewart, executive director of the company. "We want to try and offer more experiences for more people."

This is a problem for Vancouver and the cruise ship industry in the province as a whole.

READ MORE:
Vancouver could have seen a record cruising season

A similar problem arose last year when JoySister ship, huge Norwegian blissalso had to wait for a low tide to carefully make his way into the Burrard entrance.

With more ships built at similar levels to accommodate increased passenger demand and comfort, local industry is concerned about the huge economic losses.

"Visit the [a standard cruise ship] worth, conservatively, $ 3 million for the provincial economy, "said Barry Penner of the International Crossroads Association." Ship as[on[the[на[the Joy]is even bigger, so it offers significantly more and can bring even greater economic benefits. "

WATCH: (Broadcast May 6, 2018) Why Vancouver Can Lost the Big Stream of Boat Ship





This benefit is increasingly moving to Seattle, where Joy is set to call its home port for summer.

Without the ability to lift or remove the bridge of Lions Gate, Penner said it was time to consider an alternative home for the shipbuilding industry that has no such limitations.

"We see an option for another terminal somewhere outside the center of the port, perhaps towards the Delta," said Penner. "It's not in the city center, but it will be closer to the airport, and globally, it's not that far from the city center."

READ MORE:
The largest cruise ship ever entered the Vancouver harbor takes passengers

Despite concerns about its future, the Vancouver port still predicts another record cruise season this year, with a 21 percent increase in passenger traffic compared to 2018.

Jenner said there is still a high demand in the world for sailing to and from Vancouver, and hopes the province and federal governments will withdraw if they feel the need for funding.

"Sometimes it's a surprise that we can not rest on our laurels," he said. "It will be a true leadership and vision for us to stay in the game for the next 20 to 30 years if we want to stay in the forefront of this industry."

– With files from Aaron McArthur

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.


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