Sunday , August 1 2021

Jeff Bezos and Elon Masks want to get to the moon – they simply disagree on how to get there




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This Thursday, at 16 o'clock, ET, Jeff Bezos will publish an advertisement for his space company Blue Origin. The image of an invitation sent to members of the press, a glimpse of the Earth as seen from the moon, suggests that the founder of Amazon will disclose Blue Origin Plans to send robotic and human missions to the surface of the moon, perhaps with an agreement with NASA.

If this is the case, he will not be alone. Aircraft contractor Lockheed Martin has already presented his lunar plans in partnership with NASA. And Elon Musk's "SpaceX" has a lunar mission plan, while NASA administrator Jim Bridgestone has proposed to the Senate Committee in March that the agency is open to using commercial heavy elevators for its lunar crew missions. Falcon Heavy SpaceX can serve such a mission.

The last few years have seen increased interest in returning the moon. The Trump administration announced that it wants NASA to return people to the moon by 2024, and the agency has announced plans for "Monthly portal"- A space station orbits around the moon to be developed in conjunction with multiple space agencies." This space station carries with it opportunities for commercial companies to develop moon facilities to provide support for the missions of the Portal.

Lockheed Martin has a long history with NASA and lunar research – was one of the Apollo mission executives. But billionaires Musk, who runs Tesla, as well as SpaceX and Bezos, represent the growing commercial space industry, and the paths of the two appropriate people to reach this point can not be very different.

What both companies have in common is that both are many products of the visions of their founders. Jeff Bezos founded Blue Origin in 2000, just three years after Amazon's IPO fed its wealth. Two years later, fresh with the sale of PayPal, Musk founded SpaceX with its personal wealth.

However, from there, the paths of companies vary. In the next 15 years, Blue Origin barely made noise, except for some controversy, while Bezos bought land in Texas to serve as a test facility of the company in the early 2000s, and some small announcements of milestones that they scored in contracts made with NASA about $ 25.7 million to finance the development of space. Bezos remains the sole owner of Blue Origin, and Forbes estimates that the richest man in the world has diverted over $ 1.5 billion from his personal wealth in the company, funded by the sale of Amazonian shares.

SpaceX, meanwhile, was nothing but quiet. The company began to make noise in December 2003 when it drove its first rocket, Falcon One, from the company's headquarters in Hawthorne, California to Washington, in order to reveal it at the National Mall for an invited group of employees in the Congress, NASA and officials to the FAA. Mok regularly promotes the company and its plans for the future, his eyes firmly putting Mask's personal view that SpaceX should be the vanguard of people to become a multi-planetary civilization.

The moss was also more aggressive in getting a venture into financing and government contracts in order to support his company. Although he still maintains majority ownership (Forbes estimates that its stake in the company is over 50%), SpaceX has also raised more than $ 2.5 billion to date in investment, financing and grants and debt, with a current value of over $ 31.5 billion, according to Pitchbook. Recent SEC reports show that it aims to attract another $ 500 million in capital this year.

Over the past decade, SpaceX has been kept in the public eye because it has brought the "silos of the Silicon Valley" movement and breaking things to a traditionally more conservative aviation industry.

"SpaceX is out of trying for new things, speeding innovation, breaking things," said Chad Anderson, founder of Space Angels, a VC company specializing in the space industry. & nbsp; "They tested a lot, and we saw some failures. We saw rocket explosions – they even put a prominent reel together with rockets that exploded as they tried to follow them. They regard it as a pride that they want to try new things and really capture the imagination to the public that way ".

By contrast, Blue Origin rarely makes big announcements about future plans, unless it is inevitable due to public contracts or other reasons, preferring to focus its efforts on pushing on what has been achieved. "Bezos is proud when he makes a big announcement, he wants to talk about the things he has done," Anderson said. A rare exception to this is her plan for the moon. Her robotic landing of the cargo cargo Blue Moon was announced in 2017, and last summer the company revealed that it had a five-year plan to reach the moon.

While SpaceX has accepted its high-risk innovative strategy, the development of Blue Origin is quite the opposite. The motto of the company is Ferrari at Graditem, Latin phrase meaning step by step, nervous. In interviews, Bezos cites the old military maximum that "slow is smooth and smooth is fast", and every time one of its possible missiles has a successful launch and landing, it is painted on a turtle, greeting to the morale of Ezop that "Slow and stably beat the race ".

Despite Bezos's faith in a slower, perfectionist approach to development, it is irrelevant that SpaceX has achieved more success – at least until now. Although Blue Origin has 11 successful launches to date, it has yet to send any spacecraft to orbit instead of keeping its started submarine, such as the Mercury spacecraft, which inspires its current system.

SpaceX, on the other hand, has over 70 successful commercial orbital launches, which include not only placing satellites in orbit, but also 15 successful cargo shipments to the International Space Station. It was the first company to deliver a cargo to the station, and the company also noticed two successful layoffs from the Falcon Heavy rocket, currently the most powerful rocket in commercial production.

This record also came at some cost for the company. There have been several setbacks in the launch, some of which have resulted in a loss of user loads, and more recently a test-fire of space rocket rockets that is being developed to deliver astronauts to the space station has led to the destruction of that craft, possibly imposed the schedule for sending astronauts to the station by 2020. The company was originally set up to have its first successful crew in 2017.

In this race of billionaires on the moon, Bezos and Moscow were set up like Skull and Rabbit, respectively. But it will probably not be until at least in the mid-2020s that we will learn which approach will win.

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This Thursday, at 16 o'clock, ET, Jeff Bezos will publish an advertisement for his space company Blue Origin. The image of an invitation sent to members of the press, a glimpse of the Earth as seen from the moon, suggests that the founder of Amazon will disclose Blue Origin Plans to send robotic and human missions to the surface of the moon, perhaps with an agreement with NASA.

If this is the case, he will not be alone. Aircraft contractor Lockheed Martin has already presented his lunar plans in partnership with NASA. And Elon Musk's "SpaceX" has a lunar mission plan, while NASA administrator Jim Bridgestone has proposed to the Senate Committee in March that the agency is open to using commercial heavy elevators for its lunar crew missions. Falcon Heavy SpaceX can serve such a mission.

The last few years have seen increased interest in returning the moon. The Trump administration announced that it wants NASA to return people to the moon by 2024, and the agency has also announced plans for the Moon Gateway – a space station that orbits the Moon that will be developed in collaboration with multiple space agencies. This space station brings opportunities for commercial companies to develop moon facilities to provide support for the portal's missions.

Lockheed Martin has a long history with NASA and lunar research – was one of the Apollo mission executives. But billionaires Musk, who runs Tesla, as well as SpaceX and Bezos, represent the growing commercial space industry, and the paths of the two appropriate people to reach this point can not be very different.

What both companies have in common is that both are many products of the visions of their founders. Jeff Bezos founded Blue Origin in 2000, just three years after Amazon's IPO fed its wealth. Two years later, fresh with the sale of PayPal, Musk founded SpaceX with its personal wealth.

However, from there, the paths of companies vary. In the next 15 years, Blue Origin barely made noise, except for some controversy, while Bezos bought land in Texas to serve as a test facility of the company in the early 2000s, and some small announcements of milestones that they scored in contracts made with NASA about $ 25.7 million to finance the development of space. Bezos remains the sole owner of Blue Origin, and Forbes estimates that the richest man in the world has diverted over $ 1.5 billion from his personal wealth in the company, funded by the sale of Amazonian shares.

SpaceX, meanwhile, was nothing but quiet. The company began to make noise in December 2003 when it drove its first rocket, Falcon One, from the company's headquarters in Hawthorne, California to Washington, in order to reveal it at the National Mall for an invited group of employees in the Congress, NASA and officials to the FAA. Mok regularly promotes the company and its plans for the future, his eyes firmly putting Mask's personal view that SpaceX should be the vanguard of people to become a multi-planetary civilization.

The moss was also more aggressive in getting a venture into financing and government contracts in order to support his company. Although he still maintains majority ownership (Forbes estimates that its stake in the company is over 50%), SpaceX has also raised more than $ 2.5 billion to date in investment, financing and grants and debt, with a current value of over $ 31.5 billion, according to Pitchbook. Recent SEC reports show that it aims to attract another $ 500 million in capital this year.

Over the past decade, SpaceX has been kept in the public eye because it has brought the "silos of the Silicon Valley" movement and breaking things to a traditionally more conservative aviation industry.

"SpaceX is out of trying for new things, speeding innovation, breaking things," said Chad Anderson, founder of Space Angels, a VC company specializing in the space industry. "They tested a lot, and we saw some failures. We saw rocket explosions – they even put a prominent reel together with rockets that exploded as they tried to follow them. They regard it as a pride that they want to try new things and really capture the imagination to the public that way ".

By contrast, Blue Origin rarely makes big announcements about future plans, unless it is inevitable due to public contracts or other reasons, preferring to focus its efforts on pushing on what has been achieved. "Bezos is proud when he makes a big announcement, he wants to talk about the things he has done," Anderson said. A rare exception to this is her plan for the moon. Her robotic landing of the cargo cargo Blue Moon was announced in 2017, and last summer the company revealed that it had a five-year plan to reach the moon.

While SpaceX has accepted its high-risk innovative strategy, the development of Blue Origin is quite the opposite. The motto of the company is Ferrari at Graditem, Latin phrase meaning step by step, nervous. In interviews, Bezos cites the old military maximum that "slow is smooth and smooth is fast", and every time one of its possible missiles has a successful launch and landing, it is painted on a turtle, greeting to the morale of Ezop that "Slow and stably beat the race ".

Despite Bezos's faith in a slower, perfectionist approach to development, it is irrelevant that SpaceX has achieved more success – at least until now. Although Blue Origin has 11 successful launches to date, it has yet to send any spacecraft to orbit instead of keeping its started submarine, such as the Mercury spacecraft, which inspires its current system.

SpaceX, on the other hand, has over 70 successful commercial orbital launches, which include not only placing satellites in orbit, but also 15 successful cargo shipments to the International Space Station. It was the first company to deliver a cargo to the station, and the company also noticed two successful layoffs from the Falcon Heavy rocket, currently the most powerful rocket in commercial production.

This record also came at some cost for the company. There have been several setbacks in the launch, some of which have resulted in a loss of user loads, and more recently a test-fire of space rocket rockets that is being developed to deliver astronauts to the space station has led to the destruction of that craft, possibly imposed the schedule for sending astronauts to the station by 2020. The company was originally set up to have its first successful crew in 2017.

In this race of billionaires on the moon, Bezos and Moscow were set up like Skull and Rabbit, respectively. But it will probably not be until at least in the mid-2020s that we will learn which approach will win.


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