Friday , May 14 2021

New species are discovered in the Law



Twenty-one scientists from all over Australia work at Biryagai during this part of the Bush Blossom, Australia's largest nature conservation project.

They are moving on foot along the way to return samples from the huge bush Tidbinbila, Namagi National Park, the Australian National Botanical Garden, and even the gardens of the parliamentary house.

ACT AKP government ecologist, Mark Jeebbsons, is investigating rakia rakia that has recently blotted out.

ACT AKP government ecologist, Mark Jeebbsons, is investigating rakia rakia that has recently blotted out.Credit:Sitthixay Ditthavong

To get to the outermost and inaccessible areas, they even have a helicopter.

In 36 expeditions of 2010, Bush Blitz – a partnership between the federal government, Earthwatch Australia and BHP – has discovered more than 1600 new species, including 71 in the Namaji National Park five years ago.

Dr Raven said such results and his experience at Canberra, where he completed his postdoctoral research in 1984, convinced the locals of the importance of their environment.

"I think something that I am particularly surprised is that it has so much variety so close to a city as Canberra, which is a city made," he said.

"I know [Canberrans] I do not know how important it is. I know they do not appreciate it, because I did not appreciate it for a week or so earlier when I came and saw the beautiful forests so close to the city. "

He said taxonomy has been critically underfunded in Australia and around the world, making resources available during Bush's blazing invaluable.

Bush Blitz manager Joe Harding agreed, saying that while many people did not see the need to distinguish different species of a particular animal, there were often important implications in the new discovery.

"If you have something and no name, you can not do anything with it," said Mrs Harding.

"You can not put it in a list, you can not share information about it with other scientists.

"If you do not have a name, you do not know if it's a new frog or cure for cancer, because no one can do the necessary work on it. It's pretty important."

These are not just new species that scientists are looking for.

The New South Wales University enthusiast, Ryan Scheffer, uses a butterfly Tidinbill collection network.

The New South Wales University enthusiast, Ryan Scheffer, uses a butterfly Tidinbill collection network.Credit:Sitthixay Ditthavong

The entomologist at the University of New South Wales, Dr Ryan Schofener, has specialized in bugs and is often so excited to return the sample that has been known for a long time.

"Nobody really works for this group since the 60s in Australia," he said,

"There is a lot that is not known, so if it's not a new kind, it may not have been collected for a long time. Both are very valuable to us."

The Bush Blitz Day community will be held Sunday at the Australian National Botanical Garden from 10 to 15 o'clock.

Blake Fodden is a journalist on Sunday at the Canberra Times. Worked as a journalist in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

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