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Home / africa / Over 110,000 people quit to care for relatives with dementia firms £ 3.2 billion this year – Sun

Over 110,000 people quit to care for relatives with dementia firms £ 3.2 billion this year – Sun



More than 110,000 people have been forced to quit their jobs to care for a relative with dementia – with firms suffering £ 3.2 billion a year.

Charities say the crisis in dementia care means desperate families have no choice but to leave their jobs to take care of their loved ones.

    Charities say dementia care crisis means desperate families have no choice but to leave their jobs

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Charities say dementia care crisis means desperate families have no choice but to leave their jobsCredit: Alami

The lost experience and productivity decline as a result of the 112,540 people leaving the workforce will cost business in England £ 2.6 billion in 2019.

Another 147,000 people had to cut their hours or see work suffer as a result of their ancillary responsibilities at £ 654.9m.

They usually spend seven hours a week helping someone cook, wash, dress and take pills, the Center for Economics and Business Research reveals.

But that means they can be left tired, stressed and sick as a result, their work result suffers.

The Alzheimer's Society, which commissioned the study, said the budget cuts mean it is impossible for many dementia patients to receive state care.

The charity urges the government to make proposals in the Queen's Speech that results in long-term social protection reform.

It states that high quality dementia care should be available to everyone with the condition.

END OF "DAY TAX"

And it wants to end the "dementia tax", which shows that people with the disease are charged on average 15% more than usual care.

Ere Jeremy Hughes, of the Alzheimer's Association, said: "Up and down families across the country are desperately trying and often failing to get the good quality dementia care their loved ones need.

Instead, over a hundred thousand people have no choice but to leave their jobs and try to take care of their loved ones on their own.

"The knock-on cost for businesses will only increase, with more and more people developing dementia and no solution found to address social protection.

"It's devastating for people with dementia, devastating to their families and carers, it's spilling over into the NHS and now we see how badly it affects our economy.

"This cannot continue.

"The government must rehabilitate social protection to provide a minimum standard of care and safety for everyone with dementia.

ONE SELL YOUR BUSINESS

"It should work like the NHS, schools and other public services, where everyone will receive quality care based on their need, not their wallet."

There are 850,000 people with dementia in the UK and 355,000 people of working age caring for someone with dementia in England.

The price for businesses has increased by £ 1.6 billion over the past four years and is expected to rise to £ 6.3 billion annually by 2040.

Boris Nonson vowed to improve the care of patients with dementia when he met Barbara Windsor on Downing Street earlier this month.

The prime minister told EastEnders legend and Alzheimer's victim, 82, that he would do anything to help people living with the disease.

The government said: "Carers make an invaluable contribution to society and this should not be detrimental to their careers.

"We work with employers to promote flexible non-carer jobs and provide better access to advice and support and will consult dedicated carers' employment rights.

"We have given local authorities an additional £ 1.5bn for adult and child social protection next year, over all existing grants, to continue to stabilize the sector.

"The government will set out plans to establish a social protection system in a timely manner."

    Boris Nonson vows to improve care for patients with dementia when he meets with Barbara Windsor on Downing Street

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Boris Nonson vows to improve care for patients with dementia when he meets with Barbara Windsor on Downing StreetCredit: Darren Fletcher – The Sun.




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