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NASA's mission displays "light echoes" of the giant new black hole



NASA has discovered a stunning insight into what happens when a black hole appears near a star.

NASA used an instrument mounted on the International Space Station to detect the X-ray of the recently discovered black hole MAXI J1820 + 070 (J1820 for short).

They were fortunate to study the black hole while spending material from an accompanying star.

The resulting X-ray waves formed a "light turnout" that was reflected by the rotating gas near the black hole and revealed changes in the size and shape of the environment.

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Impression of the artist of the event: X-ray waves formed

Impression of the artist of the event: X-ray waves formed

Impression of the event's artist: X-ray waves formed a "light turnout" that reflected on a whirlpool gas near a black hole and revealed changes in the size and shape of the environment.

MAXI BLACK TREE

The J1820 is located about 10,000 light-years away to the constellation Leo.

Astronomers were unaware of the presence of a black hole until March 11, 2018, when an outbreak was observed by the Japanese Space Space Research Agency X-ray Image (MAXI), also on board the space station.

The J1820 went from a completely unknown black hole to one of the brightest X-ray sky sources for several days.

Scientists have drawn the surrounding around a black hole of a stellar mass that is 10 times the mass of the Sun, using NASA's "Neutron star" (NICER) at the International Space Station.

NICER discovered X-ray light from the recently discovered black hole, called the MAXI J1820 + 070 (J1820 for short), because it consumed material from the accompanying star.

The researchers will give astronomers a new look at the internal operation of the black hole.

"Nike allowed us to measure light echoes closer to the black hole of the star mass than ever before," said Erin Kara, an astrophysicist at Maryland University, College Park and NASA Space Flight Center at Golddale, Greenbelt, Maryland, who introduced the findings of the 233rd American Astronomical Society in Seattle.

"Previously, these light echoes from the inner accelerator drive, seen only in supermassive black holes, which are millions to billions of sunspots and slowly change.

"Stellar black holes like the J1820 have much smaller masses and develop much faster, so we can see that the changes play on human time scales."

A document describing the findings, led by Kara, appeared in the Prince's edition of January 10 and is available online.

The J1820 is located about 10,000 light-years away to the constellation Leo.

The associated star in the system was identified in a survey by the Gaia mission of the ESA (European Space Agency), which allowed researchers to evaluate its distance.

Astronomers were unaware of the presence of a black hole until March 11, 2018, when an outbreak was observed by the Japanese Space Space Research Agency X-ray Image (MAXI), also on board the space station.

The J1820 went from a completely unknown black hole to one of the brightest X-ray sky sources for several days.

NICER quickly moved to conquer this dramatic transition and continues to follow the faded tail of the eruption.

Astronomers were unaware of the presence of a black hole until March 11, 2018, when an outbreak was observed by the Japanese Space Space Research Agency X-ray Image (MAXI), also on the ship's space station (in the picture)

Astronomers were unaware of the presence of a black hole until March 11, 2018, when an outbreak was observed by the Japanese Space Space Research Agency X-ray Image (MAXI), also on the ship's space station (in the picture)

Astronomers were unaware of the presence of a black hole until March 11, 2018, when an outbreak was observed by the Japanese Space Space Research Agency X-ray Image (MAXI), also on the ship's space station (in the picture)

A black hole may emit gas from a nearby comrade star into a ring of material called an accelerator drive.

Gravitational and magnetic forces heat the disc to millions of degrees, making it hot enough to produce X-rays on the inner parts of the disk, near the black hole.

Strikes happen when the instability of the disk causes a flood of gas to move inward, towards a black hole, like an avalanche.

The reasons for disk instability are poorly understood.

Above the disk is the corona, a subatomic particle region of about 1 billion degrees Celsius (1.8 billion Fahrenheit degrees) that shines in high-energy X-rays.

Many mysteries remain about the origin and evolution of the corona.

A black hole may emit gas from a nearby comrade star into a ring of material called an accelerator drive.

A black hole may emit gas from a nearby comrade star into a ring of material called an accelerator drive.

A black hole may emit gas from a nearby comrade star into a ring of material called an accelerator drive.

Some theories suggest that the structure can be an early form of high-speed planes that these systems often emit.

Astrophysicists want to better understand how the inner edge of the accelerating disc and the crown over it in the size and shape change, as the black hole moves the material from its associated star.

If they can understand how and why these changes occur in black holes in stellate holes over a period of weeks, scientists could shed light on how supermassive black holes develop over millions of years and how they affect galaxies in which they live.

New observations also give scientists new insights into how the material tubes in the black hole and how it liberates energy in this process.

"The J1820 NICER observations have taught us something new about the black holes of the star mass and how we can use them as analogues for the study of supermassive black holes and their effects on the formation of the galaxy," co-author Philip Uttley, an astrophysicist at University of Amsterdam.

"We've seen four similar events in the first year of NICER, and this is remarkable. It feels like we're on the verge of tremendous progress in X-ray astronomy."


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