Sunday , April 11 2021

INOFOGRAPHIC: researchers find innovative strategies to combat malaria



The Institute of Pretoria University for Sustainable Malaria Control has developed new ways to cope with this disease.

From insect resistant socks to potential new drugs from local plants, the Institute turns the heat of the deadly disease this world malaria day.

Malaria is particularly endangered in Africa: 93 per cent of malaria mortality in 2017 was only on this continent, according to the institute.

The institute aims to help prevent and eliminate malaria in South Africa by 2030, in line with the goals of sustainable UN development.

Also read: Remain without Malaria this long weekend

"The institute takes a multidisciplinary approach to the elimination and control of malaria: treating the parasite, stopping the mosquito and understanding and managing the health of endangered populations," the university said.

The Institute has announced six new ways to combat malaria in 2019:

– Dr Mtokozisi Sibanda came up with a genius plan, sockets with a built-in repellant like mosquitoes that carry malaria tend to bite the wrists and legs.

– Indigenous knowledge in collaboration with universities across the country to develop potent new drugs.

– The Institute said it will teach students a song about malaria.

"Community education has a vital role. We take an integrated approach to improving health and education to deliver our message," said Professor Tian de Jager, director of the institute.

"We have published a book called Sibo Borri Malaria, we use dramatic performances in rural areas, and we use music as a way to talk to our communities."

The institute will also study human skin for ways to catch mosquitoes because the skin produces a wide variety of chemicals called volatile organic compounds that mosquitoes can smell.

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"We will also study insecticides that work on cattle.

"Open control of malaria is becoming increasingly important, especially when we are moving towards integrated vector management and elimination," De Jager said.

Infographic: University of Pretoria

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